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The City of Cape Town has changed to Level 3 water restrictions.<div class="ExternalClassA57C73B4924A484EADA251AFA4427067"><a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and%20home/Residential-utility-services/Residential-water-and-sanitation-services/2016-residential-water-restrictions-explained">See our residential water restrictions page for more information. </a></div>

 

 

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Tougher water restrictions proposed<p>​A move to intensify water restrictions comes as a result of diminishing dam levels and consistent water use above the daily water usage targets.</p><p>‘So many of our residents have really gone above and beyond the call of duty to save water. They have been selfless and have been true water ambassadors for us. Sadly, this cannot be said about all of our residents and our water usage has been consistently above the target. We will continue to take action against these culprits and will target the city’s top 20 000 high water users – the majority of whom reside in formal areas of the metro. We are committed to bringing this group to book. They are scuppering all of our efforts to bring down water usage. </p><p>‘Within the next week, we plan to conduct increased door-to-door visits, issue more fines where applicable, and focus strongly on education and awareness. We’ll work together with our peace officers, law enforcement officers, councillors, and our newly appointed area-based mayoral committee members. </p><p>‘We will continue to do everything in our power to further reduce water usage in our own City operations. We are also requesting our religious leaders to pray for rain. </p><p>‘We must remember that formal residential consumers are by far the biggest users of potable water in the municipality, consuming approximately 70% of total water supplied. In winter, residential consumption levels are substantially lower. Therefore, if residents could use the same amount of water that they use during the winter rainy season, the current consumption would definitely go down.</p><span>​ <blockquote cite="http://wwww.cite.co.za"><p>​​​<span class="blockquoteSpan">​​​​​<img class="responsive img-circle" alt="Name Surname" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Bio%20Images/Limberg%20Xanthea.jpg" />​​<span></span></span></p><p> ​<em>"Our approach to water supply and sustainability is a long-term one where we are looking decades ahead at reliable water supply management and conservation. We have the systems in place now and going into the future. We can turn this situation around now if we all work together."</em><b>Councillor Xanthea Limberg</b><cite>City Mayoral Committee Member:  Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services, and Energy</cite></p></blockquote>​​​</span><p>The City is also engaging with the Western Cape Government and the National Government to ensure that they assist with efforts to minimise water usage. </p><h3>The City will continue to implement its other key initiatives for water management and conservation, such as: <br></h3><p>• more innovative water pressure management systems to reduce water leakage<br>• finding and repairing underground water leaks<br>• replacing ageing water mains<br>• improving response times for repairing pipe bursts<br>• promoting the use of treated effluent (recycled water) or borehole water instead of drinking water for irrigation purposes;<br>• offering plumbing repairs for indigent households free of charge<br>• introducing the stepped tariff system of billing<br>• monitoring water losses from our systems<br>• future roll-out of water demand management devices in the future<br>• creating awareness for water-saving, school visits and communication</p><h3>New restrictions, if adopted by Council, will include the following:</h3><table width="100%" class="ms-rteTable-default" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default" style="width:50%;"><strong>​Level 3</strong></td><td class="ms-rteTable-default" style="width:50%;"><strong>​Level 3b</strong></td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default">​Watering/irrigation (with drinking water from municipal supply) of gardens, lawns, flower beds and other plants, vegetable gardens, sports fields, parks and other open spaces is allowed only if using a bucket or watering can. No use of hosepipes or automatic sprinkler systems is allowed. Watering times are not restricted, however, residents are urged to limit their watering to the mornings and evenings. </td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">​Watering/irrigation (with municipal drinking water) of flower beds, lawns, vegetables and other plants, sports fields, parks and other open spaces is allowed <strong>only on Tuesdays and Saturdays before 09:00 or after 18:00 for a maximum of one hour per day per property and only if using a bucket or watering can.</strong> No use of hosepipes or any sprinkler systems allowed. </td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default">​No watering/irrigation is allowed within 24 hours of rainfall that provides adequate saturation. Facilities/customers making use of boreholes, treated effluent water, spring water or well-points are not exempt. </td><td class="ms-rteTable-default">​No watering/irrigation is allowed within <strong>48 hours </strong>of rainfall that provides adequate saturation. Facilities/customers making use of boreholes, treated effluent water, spring water or well-points are not exempt.</td></tr><tr><td class="ms-rteTable-default">​Washing (using potable water) of vehicles and boats only is allowed if using a bucket.</td><td class="ms-rteTable-default"><strong>​No washing of vehicles or boats using municipal drinking water is allowed.</strong> Vehicles and boats must be washed with non-potable water or washed at a commercial carwash. </td></tr></tbody></table><h3><br>Further to the above:</h3><p>• No washing of vehicles, including taxis, using municipal drinking water at transport interchanges will be allowed<br>• No more irrigation using potable water will be permitted at City facilities<br>• No increase of the indigent water allocation over and above the free 350 litres a day will be granted, unless through prior application and permission for specific events such as burial ceremonies <br>                              <br>All exemptions granted under Level 3 are being reviewed with the possibility of being revoked with the option for reapplication. Current water users with exemptions under Level 3 must adhere to Level 3b irrigation days and times.</p><h3>In addition to the adoption of Level 3b restrictions, the Mayoral Committee has recommended that:<br></h3><p>• the Executive Director: Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services be authorised to further amend the Level 3 water restriction measures as deemed necessary and publish revised measures accordingly, as prescribed in the City’s Water By-law<br>• the proposed Level 3B water restriction measures be implemented until lifted by the Executive Director: Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services</p><h3>Restrictions still applicable to all customers:<br></h3><p>• Borehole/well-point water must be used efficiently to avoid wastage and evaporation. Borehole/well-point water users are strongly encouraged to follow the same watering times as applicable to drinking water use detailed above<br>• All boreholes and well-points must be registered with the City and the official City of Cape Town signage must be displayed and be clearly visible from a public thoroughfare (residents can visit the City’s website for how to register)<br>• All properties where alternative, non-potable water resources are used (including rainwater harvesting, grey water reuse, treated effluent water and spring water) must display signage to this effect clearly visible from a public thoroughfare. Residents can visit the City’s website for more information: <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater">www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater</a> <br>• No washing or hosing down of hard-surfaced or paved areas with drinking water is allowed (except for health purposes). Users, such as abattoirs, food-processing industries, industries using water to prepare for painting or similar treatments, care facilities, animal shelters and other industries or facilities with special needs can apply to the Director: Water and Sanitation Management for exemption <br>• Using drinking water for ornamental water fountains or water features is strongly discouraged. If drinking water is used, the water fountains or water features must operate by recycling the water</p><h3>Restrictions still applicable to residential customers<br></h3><p>• Customers are strongly encouraged to install water-efficient parts, fittings and technologies to minimise water use at all taps, showerheads and other plumbing components<br>• Manual topping up of swimming pools is allowed only if fitted with a pool cover. No automatic top-up systems are allowed<br>• The use of portable or any temporary play pools is prohibited <br>• No increase of the indigent water allocation over and above the free 350 litres a day will be granted, unless through prior application and permission for specific events such as burial ceremonies</p><h3>Restrictions still applicable to non-residential customers<br></h3><p>• Commercial car-wash industries must comply with industry best practice norms regarding water usage per car washed<br>• Informal car washes must use only buckets and not hosepipes<br>• The use of fitted pool covers for public swimming pools is strongly encouraged where practically possible <br>• No automatic top-up systems for swimming pools are allowed<br>• Spray parks must be strictly managed to minimise water wastage<br>• Customers must install water-efficient parts, fittings and technologies to minimise water use from all taps, showerheads and other plumbing components in public places and adhere to Water By-law requirements<br>• Golf courses, sports facilities, parks, schools and learning institutions are not allowed to establish any new landscaping or sports fields, except if irrigated only with non-potable water<br>• For users supplied with water in terms of special contracts (notarial deeds, water service intermediaries or water service providers), the contract conditions shall apply</p><p>Customers should note that water pressure may be reduced to limit water leaks and that slight changes in water taste and clarity may occur due to low dam levels. For further information, residents can visit our water restrictions page on the website: <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater">www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater</a>. Customers can also contact the City via email to  <a href="mailto:water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za">water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za</a> for queries or to report contraventions.</p><span><div class="image-gallery-slider img-gal-1" id="img-gal-1" data-slides="3" data-slide="1" style="height:493.5px;"><div class="image-gallery-content" style="height:414px;">​​​​ <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-1"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Wemmershoek%20Dam%20side%20view.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> Wemmershoek Dam </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-2"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Theewaterskloof%20water%20level.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> Theewaterskloof Dam </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-3"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Theewaterskloof%20dam%20ground%20view.jpg" alt="" style="width:949px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p> <b>Wemmershoek Dam</b></p> </figcaption> </figure> </div><div class="image-gallery-control"><div class="image-gallery-caption"><p> <a title="title" href="#"> <b>Aerial view of Cape Town</b></a> - Loren ipsum dolor sit amet loren ipsum dolor sit amet Loren ipsum dolor sit amet.</p></div><div class="image-gallery-nav"><div class="nav-info">1 of 3</div><div class="slide-next"> <i class="icon arrow-white-next"></i> </div></div></div></div></span><div class="slide-prev"><br><strong>End</strong></div>2017-01-18T22:00:00Z1
Public urged to comment on City’s draft Cycling Strategy<p>​The City of Cape Town has committed substantial resources over the past eight years to pursuing the vision of a cycling-friendly city. Currently cyclists have access to at least 450 km of cycle lanes across the city, some of which are separate from the road.</p><p>‘Although some of these lanes are popular for recreational cycling, we still have not seen the growth in commuter cycling which is required to have a noticeable impact on traffic congestion, greenhouse gas emissions and to improve mobility in the lower-income areas. We evidently need a new approach, together with some key interventions from both the City and the private sector, to realise our goal to increase the percentage of commuter trips by bicycle to 8% within the next 13 years. Our new draft Cycling Strategy which is now available for public comment makes some bold proposals. I invite residents and interested and affected parties to read this document and to submit their suggestions on how we can turn Cape Town into a top cycling city,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member: Transport and Urban Development Authority (TDA), Councillor Brett Herron.</p><p>Last year the TDA’s planning department conducted a status quo assessment of cycling in Cape Town. The research included surveys of cycling movements at 50 locations across the city, an assessment of the available cycle facilities, a review of incident data involving cyclists, and engagements with relevant stakeholders.</p><p>‘The available cycling data indicates that approximately 1% of all trips in Cape Town are made by bicycle. In addition, despite the popularity of recreational cycling and participation in cycling events like the annual Cape Town Cycle Tour, the uptake of utility cycling remained stagnant for the past decade,’ said Councillor Herron.</p><span><blockquote class="pull"> <strong>​​That said, the surveys conducted confirmed that more than 500 utility cyclists cycled to work in the morning peak period.</strong> </blockquote></span><p>‘These surveys confirm that commuters either do or will cycle, but that the majority of residents cannot afford bicycles. Given the fact that low-income transport users in Cape Town spend up to 45% of their monthly household income on transport, while the international norm is between 5% and 10%, cycling is an affordable alternative – provided that we improve access to bicycles in these communities,’ said Councillor Herron.</p><p>The Cycling Strategy identifies five options to improve access to affordable bicycles, including employer programmes to purchase and maintain bicycles, a bike-share system or a lease scheme for local trips and student travel, donations, and bicycle distribution programmes.</p><p>‘Ironically, some of these challenges provide us with a golden opportunity for growing our local economy should we succeed in cultivating a cycling culture. For example, we want to explore the possibility of establishing a bicycle manufacturing plant in Cape Town that can build and provide low-cost bicycles for low-income households. Such an investment and a bike-share system will lead to job creation – but then we need our residents to take to the streets and to start a cycling revolution,’ said Councillor Herron.  </p><p>Furthermore, the research indicates that there is great potential for increasing the uptake of utility cycling to work, schools, public services, shopping and social amenities across all income groups for trips of 15 km or less.</p><p>‘The biggest potential for growing utility cycling lies in bicycle trips to railway and bus stations. Thus, if provided with the necessary facilities for safe storage, we are confident that commuters will use bicycles to ride to the closest public transport station from where they can complete the rest of their commute either by bus or train,’ said Councillor Herron.</p><h3>Key strategies identified in the draft Cycling Strategy are as follows:</h3><p>• Improved access to bicycles for lower-income communities is pivotal<br>• Road safety (traffic) and personal security (crime prevention) along cycling routes must be improved<br>• The planning, design and provision of cycling lanes must be location-specific, i.e. what works in one area does not necessarily apply in another<br>• Cycling infrastructure such as cycle lanes, bicycle parking facilities, and storage facilities must be maintained</p><p>‘For cycling to become the norm, we need a network of well-designed cycle routes and appropriate cycling infrastructure. Facilities such as lockers, changing areas, and showers for those cycling long distances may be needed and in this regard private employers will play an important role in creating an enabling environment for those who want to cycle to work,’ said Councillor Herron.</p><h3>The Cycling Strategy proposes that cycle routes must be:</h3><p>• safe – the route must limit the conflict between cyclists and other road users, in particular along routes where vehicles travel at high speeds<br>• secure – routes must be located in well-lit and populated areas<br>• direct – routes should avoid detours and must be continuous, recognisable and link all major origins and destinations<br>• comfortable – routes must be well maintained, provide a comfortable non-slip riding surface, and have gentle curves and flat gradients where possible<br>• attractive – routes must complement their surroundings and contribute to a positive cycling experience</p><p>The biggest challenges pertain to improved access to bicycles, ensuring that cycle routes are safe in terms of road safety and crime, and convincing more residents to accept and use cycling as a legitimate mode of transport.</p><p>‘Cycling gives commuters more flexibility: they can depart as and when they feel like it and do not have to wait for public transport. It is cheap and a healthy alternative to private vehicles for short trips. Also, we all have to work together to create a more liveable city which is sustainable in terms of protecting our natural environment and where it is relatively easy to move from A to B. As with other forward-thinking cities around the world, it is also our intention to gradually transform Cape Town from a vehicle-centred city to a people-centred city that is conducive to alternative modes of transport such as walking and cycling. I am urging residents and the cycling fraternity to join this very important conversation about how we can achieve this goal,’ said Councillor Herron.</p><p>Central to the debate is the need for motorists to accept cycling as a legitimate mode of transport.</p><span>​ <blockquote cite="http://wwww.cite.co.za"><p>​​​<span class="blockquoteSpan">​​​​​<img class="responsive img-circle" alt="Name Surname" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Bio%20Images/Herron%20Brett%20Norton.jpg" />​​<span></span></span></p><p> ​<em>"A mind-shift is needed where we all accept that cyclists are entitled to use the city’s roads and where there is mutual respect among road users. We also want to encourage cycling tourism so that visitors can explore our city on bicycles. The possibilities are infinite."</em><b>Brett Herron</b><cite>City Mayoral Committee Member: Transport and Urban Authority</cite></p></blockquote></span><p>The draft strategy will be available for viewing on <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/haveyoursay">www.capetown.gov.za/haveyoursay</a> and copies will be made available at subcouncil offices and City libraries from Monday 23 January 2017.</p><p>Residents and interested and affected parties will have the opportunity to submit comments, input or recommendations on the draft Cycling Strategy as from Monday 23 January 2017 to Tuesday 21 February 2017.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p>2017-01-17T22:00:00Z1
City urges extreme caution amid ongoing fires<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Mountain%20fire.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The City of Cape Town appeals to the public to be extremely cautious with open flames and other flammable materials as the prevailing weather conditions increase the risk of fire.</p><p>City firefighters are still monitoring hotspots after the latest fire in Vredehoek/Deer Park last night. Approximately 160 City firefighters with 15 fire engines, four water tankers, five bush tenders and six skid units and support staff, assisted by 70 Table Mountain National Park staff with water tankers and skid units, battled gale-force winds and walls of flames throughout the night to safeguard lives and property. A number of residents opted to evacuate of their own accord. While assessments must still be completed, initial estimates are that there has been structural damage in the region of R4,5 million to four structures. Firefighters were also dealing with a large vegetation fire in the wetlands adjacent to Masiphumelele at the same time yesterday. </p><p>The Vredehoek/Deer Park fire came hot on the heels of a fire on Signal Hill and just days after firefighters managed to suppress massive fires in Simon’s Town and the Helderberg.</p><span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/skid%20pic.jpg" style="width:431px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure><p>‘The spate of fires is truly suspicious and we have an investigations team that is looking into it. The summer months are bad enough as it is, what with the hot and dry conditions and the strong south-easterly wind. It is a particularly stressful time for our Fire and Rescue Service as well as the other firefighting agencies and we need the public to help us by being careful with flammable materials, but also by reporting fires as soon as they spot them. Where people notice suspicious activity, we encourage them to report that too because we cannot rule out the possibility that some fires are started deliberately,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security, Alderman JP Smith.</p><p>Between 1 November 2016 and 12 January 2017, the City’s Fire and Rescue Service responded to 5 465 fires – an average of 75 a day. Of these, just shy of 80% were classified as bush, grass or rubbish fires. </p><p>The City of Cape Town has a firefighting complement of approximately 900 permanent staff members, with between 210 and 250 on shift at the City’s 30 fire stations at any given time. In addition, 120 seasonal firefighters are employed over the summer months and aerial firefighting support is available in the form of two helicopters and a spotter plane. The City’s Disaster Risk Management Centre is another key player in fire suppression, courtesy of its volunteer corps. The City also works closely with other agencies like Table Mountain National Park, Working on Fire and the Volunteer Wildfire Service. Where required, the City can also call on neighbouring municipalities for assistance and vice versa.</p></span></span><span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/fire.jpg" style="width:512px;" /><figcaption> <p>© City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure><p>The City has made a massive investment in its Fire and Rescue Service since 2006, increasing staff numbers and investing nearly R400 million in fire stations and vehicles, a properly-accredited training college, and plans to build two more fires stations in the next year or two. In addition, Fire and Rescue and Disaster Risk Management staff do ongoing education, training and awareness programmes in communities around fire safety, with nearly 900 sessions undertaken in 2016.</p><p>‘There has been some talk about whether Cape Town has enough money and resources to effectively fight fires, given the surge in such incidents since the start of the new year. I want to assure the public that we have the situation in hand and our track record should attest to that. Public safety is a massive priority for us, but it is also a shared responsibility. We can have all the resources in the world, but if the public doesn’t work with us, then it all comes to nought. I’ve also noted comments in the media and agree that firefighting happens before fires start through management of vegetation control around private and public property. Fire breaks are essential, but I must add that with the fires over the last few weeks, the properties affected did have fire breaks and they were mostly well maintained. However, with a freak wind like last night, you would have needed a fire break between 100 and 200 m wide to stop the fire from crossing it.</p><p>‘I also want to relay my sincere appreciation to the firefighting staff who have been moving from one exhausting conflagration to the next and to thank all other role players involved in this challenging duty, including the fire reservists and Disaster Risk Management volunteers for their outstanding coordination and relief work. Also, to communities who have demonstrated the most amazing camaraderie and public spirit in assisting with fires and supporting those affected and for their donations. Finally, a special word of thanks to neighbourhood watch organisations who have been playing an increasingly larger role supporting emergency and policing staff, which is leading to us amending our standard operating procedures to make them a formal part of the incident command posts,’ added Alderman Smith.</p><h3>Tips for preventing wildfires:</h3><p>• It is an offence to toss a burning cigarette butt from vehicles or anywhere else<br>• The sale, distribution and discharge of fireworks without a valid permit is an offence<br>• Fire-wise your garden by limiting flammable vegetation species. You will need to reduce the growth of fire-loving vegetation (usually invasive alien plants) in and around your property by cutting and trimming on a regular basis<br>• Avoid slash-and-burn or bush-clearing activities on high-risk days – you have to have a burning permit or prior authorisation<br>• Make sure that fire hydrants are clear and available for emergency services access<br>• Only braai in safe and designated areas and always put out recreational or cooking fires immediately after use – never leave them unattended<br>• Use heating, cooking or lighting devices safely – use on a stable platform and not near flammable substances of any kind<br>• When camping, extinguish candles, open fires and cigarettes before going to sleep<br>• Always keep matches, lighters, paraffin and poisonous substances out of the reach of children<br>• Make a proper firebreak between your home and nearby vegetation to protect your property<br>• Use safety caps on all poisonous or flammable substances containers</p><p>Fires must be reported to the City’s Public Emergency Communication Centre by dialling 021 480 7700 from a cellphone or 107 from a landline.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p></span>2017-01-16T22:00:00Z1
Water use climbs again<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/look%20out%20point.jpg" style="width:512px;" /><figcaption> <p>Wemmerhoek Dam</p><p>© City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>Despite the warning last week that water consumption was rising, the latest statistics on water consumption throughout Cape Town show another worrying spike. </p><p>Collective consumption for the week ending 15 January 2017 is up to 890 million litres per day. This is up from 859 million litres per day the previous week, and is 90 million litres per day above targeted levels. </p><p>According to the City of Cape Town’s latest information, the dam levels are at 42,5 %. </p><p>The City is currently following due process to tighten and strengthen the existing Level 3 water restrictions. This would be subject to Council approval, however as an example, more stringent conditions on the use of potable water for watering gardens could be implemented.  </p><p>The City is also in the process of identifying properties with excessive water use. The City will target these customers for inspections and water usage enforcement. </p><p>‘If current consumption continues, the City expects that dam levels could be at a level of approximately 20% by the start of winter. This leaves a very low margin of safety as it is difficult to extract the last 10% of a dam’s volume. We do not expect to run out of water before the next rainy season but constant water usage above the target of 800 million litres per day of collective use, as has been the case, is not sustainable. We have the ability now to turn this situation around. And we will only be able to do this if water use is reduced and members of the public help us to do so. </p><p>‘Worryingly, there has been a lot of speculation lately seeking to attribute the missed targets to the influx of tourists, the recent spate of fires, or poor water habits in informal settlements. Such speculation is dangerous in that many people could relax their savings efforts or use these kinds of excuses to dodge the responsibility they have to reduce their water usage. Any finger-pointing or buck-passing on this issue will not help us reach our target,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services, Councillor Xanthea Limberg.</p><p>While vigilance in terms of possible wastage needs to be encouraged, we must remember that formal residential consumers are by far biggest users of potable water in the municipality, consuming approximately 70% of total water supplied – half of which is used for less essential purposes such as watering gardens, washing cars and filling pools. </p><p>‘Water supplied to informal settlements, for firefighting, and to tourists does not come close to this figure. Bearing this in mind, our water security going forward will largely rest on whether or not residential customers can do what’s necessary to save water,’ said Councillor Limberg.</p><p>It is also crucial that those who waste water are held accountable, and key to this is residents reporting contraventions. Residents should report water wastage via email to <a href="mailto:water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za">water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za</a>. The City undertakes regular blitz operations and does proactive monitoring, however such is the scale of the task that unless residents play their part and assist with raising awareness, reporting contraventions and providing evidence of alleged contraventions, it will be limited in its efficacy. </p><span><div class="image-gallery-slider img-gal-1" id="img-gal-1" data-slides="3" data-slide="1" style="height:493.5px;"><div class="image-gallery-content" style="height:414px;">​​​​ <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-1"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/lookout%20when%20fuller.jpg" alt="" style="width:949px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;">   Lookout when fuller </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-2"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/tower%20when%20fuller.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> Tower when fuller </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-3"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/look%20out%20tower.jpg" alt="" style="width:949px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p>   <b>Wemmershoek Dam now</b></p> </figcaption> </figure> </div><div class="image-gallery-control"><div class="image-gallery-caption"><p> <a title="title" href="#"> <b>Aerial view of Cape Town</b></a> - Loren ipsum dolor sit amet loren ipsum dolor sit amet Loren ipsum dolor sit amet.</p></div><div class="image-gallery-nav"><div class="nav-info">1 of 3</div><div class="slide-next"> <i class="icon arrow-white-next"></i> </div></div></div></div></span><p><strong>End</strong><br></p>​​</span>2017-01-16T22:00:00Z1