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The City of Cape Town has implemented Level 3B water restrictions as of 01/02/2017<div class="ExternalClassA57C73B4924A484EADA251AFA4427067"><a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and%20home/Residential-utility-services/Residential-water-and-sanitation-services/2016-residential-water-restrictions-explained">See our residential water restrictions page for more information. </a></div>

 

 

Comment on the upgrade of Kruskal Avenue, Bellville
Water and Sanitation DepartmentGP0|#ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172;L0|#0ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172|water demand management;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#5ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e;L0|#05ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e|water management services;GP0|#1e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4;L0|#01e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4|sanitation services;GP0|#5d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3;L0|#05d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3|Water management device;GP0|#e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb;L0|#0e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb|water quality management;GP0|#8f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567;L0|#08f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567|water restrictions;GP0|#6c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6;L0|#06c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6|water services;GP0|#3d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024;L0|#03d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024|sewer network;GP0|#d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586;L0|#0d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586|Utility services;GP0|#d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd;L0|#0d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd|potable water;GP0|#40fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a;L0|#040fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a|meter reading;GP0|#b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24;L0|#0b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24|scientific services;GP0|#a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5;L0|#0a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5|wastewater system;GP0|#cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03;L0|#0cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03|water installation;GP0|#da4d6418-6b72-42af-93bf-02f108193161;L0|#0da4d6418-6b72-42af-93bf-02f108193161|Level 3b Water restrictions;GPP|#90b49a62-96e2-436a-9c68-187c9ab33534
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SMMEs benefit from supplier boot camp<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/smme.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>Small business owners often bemoan the frustration of trying to navigate the red tape and reams of paperwork associated with legal requirements and industry changes. The City supports the Smart Supplier Development Programme, which provides valuable support to small-, medium-, and micro-enterprises (SMMEs) in this often difficult environment.</p><p>‘Entrepreneurship is a key driver of economic growth and job creation. It is therefore crucial that small businesses receive support to grow and expand their footprint. We believe that Cape Town is an innovative, globally competitive business city. Therefore, we need to create a business environment that not only attracts large corporates, but also supports our local small businesses to grow and survive. </p><p>‘Through this annual programme, we take a group of about 40 SMMEs on a journey of development and growth. Along the way, we help small business owners to identify their challenges and we provide them with solutions to overcome these challenges,’ said the City’s Executive Deputy Mayor, Alderman Ian Neilson.</p><p>Participants in the boot camp were enthusiastic about all they learned and saw value in how it will change the way they do business in future. </p><p>Vuyokazi Luxande, Director of Mthombo Cleaning and Vegetation Management, a 100% black female-owned business based in Bellville, shared how the programme has empowered her to explore other ways of doing business: ‘I am really tired of tenders, now I am seeing things through a different lens. The workshop has helped me understand the reasons why I haven’t been successful in a tender. I now know there are processes to follow when tendering’.  </p><p>Vuyokazi will be changing her business development approach in the context of new legislative changes. She is moving away from focusing on tenders only and will instead look at collaboration and partnerships with larger suppliers for business opportunities.</p><p>‘I have done a tender before, but the programme showed me where to go and look for tenders. It has also shown me what areas I need to work on for my businesses so that I don’t lose out,’ said Grace Cable from CG Plastics cc, a 100% black female-owned business based in Ottery East.</p><p>Quite often, new legislation creates a huge knowledge gap for small businesses. </p><p>Tania Andrews, Director of Custom Graphics located in the foreshore, spoke passionately about the need to impart knowledge to SMMEs: ‘As small businesses, we don’t always have the required understanding regarding legislation. Learning about the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act and how corporate companies do their buying is something we need to understand’.</p><p>The CEO of TK Global and one of the Smart Supplier Programme facilitators, Kamogelgo Mampane, said they had enjoyed taking these businesses on this journey. </p><p>‘They can now look differently at how to market their businesses and how they can now access decision-makers,’ he said. </p><p>‘The City is proud to be a part of this initiative that supports supplier development and creates possible new markets for city vendors to explore in the business sector. Through this initiative, we contribute to creating an enabling environment for enterprise development and business growth. I can confidently say that the City of Cape Town is getting on with creating a forward-thinking business city, both locally and globally,’ added Alderman Neilson.</p><p>In addition to participating in linkage platforms such as this, small businesses can also attend the Smart Procurement World Western Cape Enterprise and Supplier Development Expo, which will be held at the Cape Town International Convention Centre on 8 March 2017. Entrance to the expo is free. This programme is run in conjunction with Smart Procurement World Western Cape and further information is available here: <a href="http://www.smartprocurementworld.com/westerncape">www.smartprocurementworld.com/westerncape</a></p><p><br><strong>End</strong><br></p>​​</span>2017-02-23T22:00:00Z1
Drought crisis: bad apples ruining the efforts of the many water-savers<p>During this time of drought, we have appealed to all residents, businesses, and government departments to work with the City of Cape Town to conserve water.</p><p>Reducing consumption is the key intervention during a time of drought as international best practice shows. </p><p>The City continues to monitor the water usage of the top 20 000 high water consumers in formal residences as well as commercial, industrial, and government properties in all suburbs. No one is escaping our efforts to see to it that consumption is reduced voluntarily, or forcibly if required.</p><p>We have such great water ambassadors in every suburb, but we have many rotten apples as well who are spoiling all of our efforts to conserve water.</p><p>Over the past week, the City has issued 36 fines for contraventions of Level 3B restrictions.</p><p>The fines range from R500 to R2 000 and were issued in the following areas:</p><ul><li>Blackberry Mall, Strandfontein</li><li>Van der Heever Street, Kuils River</li><li>Building site in Mitchells Plain</li><li>Riebeek Street, Cape Town</li><li>Building site in Duinefontein Road, Heideveld</li><li>Rosmead Avenue, Kenilworth</li><li>Turfhall Road, Lansdowne</li><li>Barnard Street, Bellville</li><li>Hippo Lane, Zeekovlei</li><li>Vasco Boulevard, Vasco</li><li>16th Avenue, Elsies River</li><li>Voortrekker Road, Parow</li><li>Cambridge Street, Plattekloof</li><li>Car dealership in Voortrekker Road, Bellville</li><li>Island Park, Paarden Eiland</li><li>Duminy Street, Parow</li><li>Durban Road, Wynberg</li><li> Building site in Retreat</li><li>Victoria Road, Southfield</li></ul><p>These fines were issued to residents and businesses for various contraventions, including using potable water to wash a vehicle, washing down hard surfaces with a hosepipe, irrigating without permission and outside designated times for garden watering, use of a sprinkler, and water wastage (i.e. leaking taps, pipes, overflowing hot water cylinders). </p><p>It is unacceptable that people are still not adhering to water restrictions. This is unlawful. </p><p>This abuse of water means that we will all suffer.</p><p>In terms of naming water abusers, the City will only publish the identities of residents or commercial properties once they have paid a fine or once they have appeared in court in connection with their transgression of Level 3B restrictions.</p><p>There are many residents and businesses who are doing their utmost to save water and we thank them for their efforts. This is making a difference but if we all work together, we can manage the drought crisis in a collaborative manner even better.</p><p>During my visit to Pinelands last week and driving through various areas in Cape Town, I have noticed many dry gardens and this tells me that most residents are working with us to save water.</p><p>In addition, I have communicated that I am personally calling commercial properties about their water use where we have noticed higher than average consumption patterns.</p><p>The response from the commercial sector has been very good and they have committed to doing even more to work with the City to enhance their water conservation efforts.</p><p>The Tsogo Sun hotel group wrote to me following my call to say that they have introduced several measures to save water. This includes installing flow-restrictors on taps and low-pressure heads on showers. Staff members are continually monitoring water usage against certain targets. The hotel group has also put up notices at the reception counters urging guests to assist in saving water.</p><p>The Vineyard Hotel has implemented several initiatives to convert their business into a sustainable enterprise. For example, they have installed low-flow shower heads in all guest bathrooms and have a strict maintenance programme to monitor and correct leaks.</p> The Shoprite group has suspended all garden irrigation and washing of trucks across all of its facilities in the province and they are using bricks in all toilet cisterns to save water. An audit of all taps in stores has been undertaken, with self-closing taps being installed where problems have been identified. <p> </p><p>The Cape Town International Airport has also communicated their commitment to minimising water consumption. Some of the changes they have implemented include low-flush systems and sensors on bathroom taps, indigenous landscaping, and making use of borehole water for irrigation.</p><p>In our own operations, the City has implemented drastic water-saving measures. This includes not watering vegetation in our parks, issuing strict directives for the use of only non-potable water in cases where vegetation must be watered for essential purposes, and even shutting off the water supplied to fountains irrespective of whether non-potable water is being used.</p><p>In addition, washing of the exterior of our buses, which was previously undertaken on a daily basis, was limited to once every two weeks. In many of our buildings, we have retrofitted our toilets with dual-flush water-wise toilets. We are currently expanding our existing pressure reduction programme to effect more water savings.</p><p>Where we can improve efficiencies in our own operations, we are making every effort to do so.</p><p>Furthermore, a total of 270 special exemptions have been revoked and we are currently reviewing Level 3 special exemptions, which include large single residential units, body corporates, homeowners associations, and estates, so as to bring them in line with the stricter Level 3b water restrictions criteria. Exemptions remain under scrutiny and there is no guarantee that a beneficiary will again be granted an exemption.</p><p>The following table outlines water usage per category:</p><div class="mobile-scroll">​​<br> <table><thead><tr><th>Category</th><th>Percentage</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Houses</td><td>55,6%</td></tr><tr><td>Flats and complexes</td><td>9,2%</td></tr><tr><td>Domestic other (e.g. old-age homes, homeless shelters)</td><td>1,8%</td></tr><tr><td>Informal settlements </td><td>4,7%</td></tr><tr><td>Retail and offices </td><td>11%</td></tr><tr><td>Industry </td><td>3,9%</td></tr><tr><td>City-owned facilities and departments </td><td>5,2%</td></tr><tr><td>Government </td><td>2,5%</td></tr><tr><td>Other (standpipes supplied for construction purposes, schools, sports grounds, community organisations </td><td>6,1%</td></tr><tr><td>Total </td><td>100%</td></tr></tbody></table></div>​​​ <p>Residents can contact the City via email to <a href="mailto:water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za">water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za</a> for queries or to report contraventions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts) or they can send an SMS to 31373.</p><p>For further information, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater">www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater</a> </p><p> <b>End</b></p>2017-02-22T22:00:00Z1
New start for Morningstar beneficiaries <span><div class="notification with-heading dark-copy pink bg-light-grey"><div class="graphic with-border"> <i class="info note">​​</i> </div><div class="desc"><h4>Note to editors</h4><p> The following speech was delivered by City of Cape Town Executive Mayor, Patricia de Lille, at a sod-turning event in Morningstar, Durbanville where the City will be building 166 units to house more than 650 beneficiaries. .</p></div></div></span><p>Mayoral Committee Member: Transport and Urban Development Authority, Councillor Brett Herron; members of the Morningstar Project Steering Committee; City councillors; officials and contractors; distinguished guests; members of the media; ladies and gentlemen.</p><p>Good morning, goeie môre, molweni, as-salaamu alaikum, shalom.</p><p>I am very excited to be here with you today as we turn the first sod for the Morningstar Housing Development.</p><p>One of the main priorities that I identified for the next five years is to address the legacy of apartheid spatial planning. </p><p>It is very clear that many people remain in the areas where they were dumped during the apartheid era. </p><p>Most of these areas are far removed from proper transport infrastructure.</p><p>They were also intentionally placed far away from areas of economic opportunity, where residents could find jobs. </p><p>We had elections only six months ago. When we campaigned, we made a promise that we would build a city that is more integrated and that development would take place close to transport corridors. </p><p>We said that we want people to live closer to economic opportunities. </p><p>We also said it is an indictment that the poor are spending 40% of their income on getting to work and accessing economic opportunities every day. </p><p>As such, our new Organisational Development and Transformation Plan prioritises transit-oriented urban growth and development.</p><p>The Morningstar Housing Development is proof that our words were more than just lip service. </p><p>We are taking the necessary steps to the re-envision and re-create our city. </p><p>The units that we will be building here are all situated on this great transport arterial, Langeberg Road. </p><p>This area is only 2 km from the Durbanville CBD and only 10 km from Cape Town’s second biggest CBD, Bellville. </p><p>The development is in close proximity to the major activity routes and it is close to the Durbanville taxi rank.</p><p>We will also be building a brand new taxi- and bus-embayment for the residents who will stay here.</p><p>As an inclusive city, we are going to make sure that the people of Morningstar feel connected and part of the rest of the city. </p><p>The City is spending R34,1 million on this development which spans over 1,6 hectares of land. </p><p>We will be building 166 Breaking New Ground homes to the benefit of about 664 people.</p><p>We know that the houses are going to those who need them most.</p><p>These are government-subsidised houses, so the beneficiaries are residents who earn less than R3 500 per month.</p><p>The allocation list has been finalised and I want to thank the Project Steering Committee present here with us today for their leadership in this regard.</p><p>You were entrusted with the faith of the beneficiaries and you have succeeded in your mandate thus far.</p><p>Should the road become rocky ahead, I ask you to remember this milestone so that it can motivate you once more. </p><p>I want to wish the contractors and project managers well as they embark on this project.</p><p>You are always behind the scenes but we appreciate the work that you do.</p><p>Please remember that you carry the hopes of many community members on your shoulders. </p><p>This should motivate you to keep to the timelines which you have set. </p><p>We all need to keep working together because the beneficiaries have waited long enough to have their own homes. </p><p>I look forward to us all getting together again in March next year to welcome them home. </p><p>I thank you. God bless. </p><span><div class="image-gallery-slider img-gal-1" id="img-gal-1" data-slides="3" data-slide="1" style="height:493.5px;"><div class="image-gallery-content" style="height:414px;">​​​​ <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-1"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Brett%20Herron%20and%20Mayor.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> Mayor and the Morning Star steering committee </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-2"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Duke%20Gumede%20and%20Mayor.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> Mayor Patricia de Lille and Duke Gumede </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-3"> <img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Morning%20Star%20site.jpg" alt="" style="width:800px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p>                <strong>Morning Star,Durbanville</strong></p> </figcaption> </figure> </div><div class="image-gallery-control"><div class="image-gallery-caption"><p> <a title="title" href="#"> <b>Aerial view of Cape Town</b></a> - Loren ipsum dolor sit amet loren ipsum dolor sit amet Loren ipsum dolor sit amet.</p></div><div class="image-gallery-nav"><div class="nav-info">1 of 3</div><div class="slide-next"> <i class="icon arrow-white-next"></i> </div></div></div></div></span><p><br><strong>End</strong><br></p>2017-02-21T22:00:00Z1
City pounds crush cars to lighten the load<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/crusher3.JPG" style="width:431px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The City of Cape Town’s Traffic Service has crushed 73 vehicles that have been gathering dust at its vehicle impound facilities. </p><p>The operation, which took place on Wednesday and Thursday last week, was the second of its kind, following the destruction of 48 sedan taxi in 2015. </p><p>This time around, the vehicles comprised sedans and minibuses that did not make the cut for auction, given that they are old, in a dilapidated condition, and not roadworthy.</p><p>The City’s two vehicle impound facilities in Ndabeni and Maitland are currently home to approximately 750 vehicles. Vehicles are impounded for various reasons, including where public transport operators carry passengers without valid operating permits or operate contrary to the conditions of their permits, or if the vehicles are found to be abandoned.</p><p>Regulation 320 of the National Road Traffic Act allows for the disposal of vehicles left abandoned at a traffic premises for longer than 21 days. Vehicles can be auctioned and in November 2016, the City sold 106 vehicles in this manner; however, those that are not roadworthy are disposed of by a contractor appointed to crush and compact the vehicles.</p><p>‘We have to dispose of vehicles that have been abandoned because vehicle impoundments happen on a daily basis and our two pounds are taking strain. Impound release fees are set at a stepped tariff rate and we believe motorists simply cannot afford to reclaim a vehicle that has been impounded a second or third time, which means the strategy is working. As the saying goes “wie nie hoor nie, moet voel”,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/crusher2.jpg" style="width:431px;" /><figcaption> <p>          © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> On Tuesday 14 February 2017, traffic officers held an operation in Table View where they impounded 16 taxis and issued 520 fines. They also arrested 12 suspects – one for reckless and negligent driving and 11 for outstanding warrants. A total of 115 warrants were served and 19 motorists were released on a warning.<p>Other traffic enforcement successes for the week of 13 to 18 February included:<br><br>• 121 arrests for outstanding warrants, 839 warrants served, and 266 motorists released on a warning<br>• 13 arrests for reckless and negligent driving <br>• 20 arrests for driving under the influence of alcohol<br>• 2 290 fines for various offences.</p><p>The City’s Metro Police Department netted 72 suspects for various offences during their operations in the last week, including 24 motorists for drunk driving, 41 arrests for drug offences, six for possession of suspected stolen property, and one wanted for murder.</p><p>A number of the drug arrests were made as a result of information received about illegal activities taking place at various properties in Mitchells Plain, Kraaifontein, Ocean View, Milnerton and Macassar. One of the suspects, aged 22, was searched in front of his residence in Macassar on Monday 13 February. Officers confiscated 38 dagga ‘stoppe’, 76 ‘bankies’ of dagga, two blue City of Cape Town refuse bags containing dagga, and R875 in cash.</p><p>Overall, the Metro Police Department confiscated various quantities of drugs including dagga, tik, khat and cocaine as well as just under R12 000 in cash.</p><p>It was also ‘game-over’ for a 34-year-old suspect who peddled unga on the corner of Plein and Darling Streets in the Cape Town CBD, right under the watchful gaze of CCTV camera operators on Wednesday 15 February. The operators alerted the Central City Improvement District who dispatched staff and caught the suspect with 334 units of unga in his possession. He was arrested by the South African Police Service and taken to Cape Town Central Police Station.</p><p>‘Arrests like these should sound a warning to criminals and embolden communities to speak out about illegal activities in their neighbourhoods. We don’t always have the manpower to respond immediately, but the fact is that we are responding where we can and we are reaping the results. More than half of the arrests made by Metro Police in the last week were for drug offences – the bulk of which came about because of community tips. I commend those members of the public who spoke up and lifted the lid on wrongdoing in their streets. We need more of them,’ added Alderman Smith.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p></span>​​</span>2017-02-19T22:00:00Z1