Skip to content

Search

Menu

 

 

What to grow in your food garden<h2 class="sectHeading">Green gardening is best</h2><p>Make sure you consider the individual quality of your soil and microclimate before you begin planting and growing. Not every side of the mountain is the same; for example, some soil in the city is sandier than in other areas. It is also very important to plant indigenously – that is, to plant species which belong to this natural environment.</p><div class="notification with-heading dark-copy pink bg-light-grey"><div class="graphic with-border"> <i class="info toptip"></i> </div><div class="desc"><h4>Top tip</h4><p>You can find more information on invasive alien species on our <a href="https://www.capetowninvasives.org.za/" target="_blank">Cape Town Invasives website<i class="icon link-external"></i></a>. The <a href="https://www.capetowngreenmap.co.za/" target="_blank">Cape Town Green Map<i class="icon link-external"></i></a> also has great tips on how to plant an indigenous garden. For more tips on how to create the right kind of garden, see SANBI's <a href="http://pza.sanbi.org/" target="_blank">PlantZafrica site<i class="icon link-external"></i></a>.</p></div></div><p> <strong>When planning your garden, there are some tried and trusted methods you can use to grow healthy, strong plants that are suited for our soils:</strong> </p><ul><li>Work with nature and plant according to the seasons.</li><li>Plant a variety of indigenous plants, even if not edible. This is good for the health of the soil – and you’ll have fewer pests.</li><li>Some plants work beautifully together – this is known as “companion planting”. For example, basil helps to keep pests away and leads to sweeter tomatoes.</li><li> <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and%20home/Greener-living/Green-gardening-and-eating/Start-composting-at-home">Create compost and a worm bin </a> with your kitchen waste. Compost improves the quality of your soil, resulting in healthy plants.</li><li>Use water wisely. Even when we are not in a water restriction period, water is precious and has to be conserved. Try using <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and%20home/Residential-utility-services/Residential-water-and-sanitation-services/alternative-water-sources">alternative water sources </a>for your garden.</li></ul> <span> <div class="notification with-heading dark-copy pink bg-light-grey"><div class="graphic with-border"> <i class="info toptip">​​​</i> </div><div class="desc"><h4>Top tip</h4><p> <b>Go local:</b> indigenous plants are best because they do not threaten other plant species, use less water, require less fertiliser and pesticides, attract birds and bees, and look great all year round.</p></div></div></span> <p>You can consult our <a href="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/documentcentre/Documents/Procedures%2c%20guidelines%20and%20regulations/CCT_Smart_Living_Handbook.pdf" target="_blank"> Smart Living Handbook</a> for more advice on how to grow and live smartly and sustainably in Cape Town. You may also want to read about turning your garden into a <a href="https://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and%20home/Greener-living/Green-gardening-and-eating/Commercial-food-gardens-and-city-farms">commercial venture.</a></p><h2 class="sectHeading">Planting calendar</h2><p>To help you grow food in your garden, we have created a simple planting reference guide for gardeners and urban farmers in our city.</p> <span><figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"><img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Inline%20Images/Nature%20Outdoor%20-%20Seasonal%20Calander%20-%20Summer.jpg" alt="" style="width:892px;" />​ </figure></span> <p> <b>November</b><br>Asparagus, baby marrow, beetroot, butternut, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, cucumber, corn/maize, lettuce, leek, melon/cantaloupe, spring onion, pumpkin, radish, tomato, and watermelon.</p><p> <b>December</b><br>Asparagus, baby marrow, beetroot, broccoli, Brussels sprout, butternut, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, cucumber, corn/maize, lettuce, leek, melon/cantaloupe, spring onion, pumpkin, radish, tomato, and watermelon.</p><p> <b>January</b><br>Baby marrow, beetroot, broccoli, Brussels sprout, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, cucumber, leek, lettuce, spring onion, potato, radish, watermelon. </p><p> <b>February</b><br>Beetroot, broccoli, Brussels sprout, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, garlic, leek, lettuce, spring onion, peas, potato, radish, spinach, and watermelon. </p><p> <b>March</b><br>Beetroot, broccoli, Brussels sprout, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, garlic, leek, lettuce, onion, spring onion, peas, radish, and spinach. </p> <span><figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"><img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Inline%20Images/Nature%20Outdoor%20-%20Seasonal%20Calander%20-%20Autumn.jpg" alt="" style="width:892px;" />​ </figure></span> <p> <b>April</b><br>Artichoke, broad beans, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, garlic, leek, lettuce, onion, spring onion, peas, radish, and spinach. </p><p> <b>May</b><br>Artichoke, broad beans, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, onion, spring onion, peas, radish, and spinach. </p> <span><figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"><img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Inline%20Images/Nature%20Outdoor%20-%20Seasonal%20Calander%20-%20Winter.jpg" alt="" style="width:892px;" />​ </figure></span> <p> <b>June</b><br>Artichoke, broad beans, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, onion, spring onion, peas, radish, and spinach.</p><p> <b>July</b><br>Artichoke, broad beans, beetroot, butternut, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, lettuce, onion, peas, potato, and tomato</p><p> <b>August</b><br>Artichoke, beetroot, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, corn/maize, lettuce, spring onion, peas, potato, radish, tomato.</p> <span><figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"><img class="responsive" src="https://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Inline%20Images/Nature%20Outdoor%20-%20Seasonal%20Calander%20-%20Spring.jpg" alt="" style="width:892px;" />​ </figure></span> <p> <b>September</b><br>Artichoke, baby marrow, beetroot, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, corn/maize, cucumber, leek, lettuce, melon/cantaloupe, spring onion, potato, pumpkin, radish, tomato, and watermelon. </p><p> <b>October</b><br>Asparagus, baby marrow, beetroot, butternut, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, cucumber, corn/maize, leek, lettuce, melon/cantaloupe, spring onion, pumpkin, radish, tomato, and watermelon. </p> <span> <div class="notification with-heading dark-copy pink bg-light-grey"><div class="graphic with-border"> <i class="info note">​​​</i> </div><div class="desc"><h4>Please note</h4><p> <b></b>This planting calendar is a guideline only – results may vary depending on your soil and microclimate.</p></div></div></span>GP0|#9c22df72-560c-4bd4-8ac7-f48d8fdb8193;L0|#09c22df72-560c-4bd4-8ac7-f48d8fdb8193|What to grow in your food garden;GTSet|#ef3a64a2-d764-44bc-9d69-3a63d3fadea1;GPP|#630f1ce3-4d76-4447-85fb-0afef5f00698;GPP|#39d66b11-2134-4df5-8360-0bc5e66e8f4f;GPP|#245ec7aa-a528-4cd3-bcac-597c292db711;GP0|#4c217267-2813-432f-97e1-98aba897c5ac;L0|#04c217267-2813-432f-97e1-98aba897c5ac|What to grow in your food garden;GPP|#ad6fe10c-0568-48ce-aae2-b58e1ca7d8a5;GPP|#4a553a67-2cba-4911-9745-a724e38b645a;GPP|#af370586-9ba3-404a-9d6e-02066ca42752;GP0|#1e463773-c27c-4678-a775-52b2021c6edd;L0|#01e463773-c27c-4678-a775-52b2021c6edd|What to grow in your food garden;GPP|#fe19bc42-9232-4590-8313-a4e3dae57d27;GPP|#090e430c-3809-42d5-a80b-caea93b2beafA guide to green gardening and what to grow in your food garden.0

 

 

Smart Living Handbook 20208865911GP0|#dcc8214b-489e-4c99-a7e9-6bc8bda6e154;L0|#0dcc8214b-489e-4c99-a7e9-6bc8bda6e154|Handbook;GTSet|#f1e8889f-f7d7-4d5b-a3f5-af0ca2e076ea;GPP|#d8892104-ce90-493e-b813-93c488f4b1d3;GPP|#0972c695-fd19-46c4-ab5d-9601f17b780e2020-06-29T22:00:00Z

 

 

You have disabled JavaScript on your browser.
Please enable it in order to use City online applications.