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Level 4b water restrictions from 1 July 2017<div class="ExternalClassA57C73B4924A484EADA251AFA4427067">Use less than 87L per day, fines apply for contraventions. <a href="http://www.capetown.gov.za/Family%20and%20home/residential-utility-services/residential-water-and-sanitation-services/make-water-saving-a-way-of-life">Find out more</a>.</div>

 

 

Water and Sanitation DepartmentGP0|#ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172;L0|#0ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172|water demand management;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#5ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e;L0|#05ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e|water management services;GP0|#1e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4;L0|#01e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4|sanitation services;GP0|#5d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3;L0|#05d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3|Water management device;GP0|#e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb;L0|#0e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb|water quality management;GP0|#8f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567;L0|#08f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567|water restrictions;GP0|#6c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6;L0|#06c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6|water services;GP0|#3d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024;L0|#03d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024|sewer network;GP0|#d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586;L0|#0d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586|Utility services;GP0|#d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd;L0|#0d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd|potable water;GP0|#40fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a;L0|#040fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a|meter reading;GP0|#b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24;L0|#0b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24|scientific services;GP0|#a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5;L0|#0a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5|wastewater system;GP0|#cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03;L0|#0cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03|water installation;GP0|#bfbcd1ff-7345-4ed6-92ef-4aefa57bf212;L0|#0bfbcd1ff-7345-4ed6-92ef-4aefa57bf212|wayleaves;GP0|#8fc58e15-8bcd-468f-b872-1e42c1feecbc;L0|#08fc58e15-8bcd-468f-b872-1e42c1feecbc|application
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Electricity Generation and Distribution DepartmentGP0|#f99e33ee-e68d-432c-9212-7baa2b129e1f;L0|#0f99e33ee-e68d-432c-9212-7baa2b129e1f|municipal service;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#5ca4d0f8-d954-4f76-b971-02dd94168205;L0|#05ca4d0f8-d954-4f76-b971-02dd94168205|utility service;GP0|#78ef77bd-ec89-4ecd-859e-699c88406437;L0|#078ef77bd-ec89-4ecd-859e-699c88406437|power supply;GP0|#15fe4006-3e63-4153-a48f-937a805d04f5;L0|#015fe4006-3e63-4153-a48f-937a805d04f5|planned outages;GP0|#be0d8956-cdb7-4809-be87-0ec2558803fa;L0|#0be0d8956-cdb7-4809-be87-0ec2558803fa|billing system;GP0|#40fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a;L0|#040fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a|meter reading;GP0|#f1032b58-94ee-4ddd-91bb-947149d777a1;L0|#0f1032b58-94ee-4ddd-91bb-947149d777a1|prepayment meter;GP0|#9b890b8d-9aea-40ec-9409-1d5794d35515;L0|#09b890b8d-9aea-40ec-9409-1d5794d35515|vendors;GP0|#8d25a44c-752c-4a86-bc47-c45a7cc51a26;L0|#08d25a44c-752c-4a86-bc47-c45a7cc51a26|Load shedding;GP0|#51472587-ca96-439b-b635-6bbe41cca04a;L0|#051472587-ca96-439b-b635-6bbe41cca04a|public lighting;GP0|#2be3882b-f597-49c7-8aa7-cdec50a5e39f;L0|#02be3882b-f597-49c7-8aa7-cdec50a5e39f|power station;GP0|#47a77d4c-1397-445d-8bec-584d00997158;L0|#047a77d4c-1397-445d-8bec-584d00997158|athlone gas turbine;GP0|#0e994e93-10d7-4d22-9cd5-ea3dd0048ffe;L0|#00e994e93-10d7-4d22-9cd5-ea3dd0048ffe|prepaid electricity;GP0|#f1632294-9271-4238-8f55-ec26d4425c63;L0|#0f1632294-9271-4238-8f55-ec26d4425c63|distribution network;GP0|#c939220c-f64a-463e-82d5-22b9981ccb0e;L0|#0c939220c-f64a-463e-82d5-22b9981ccb0e|Eskom;GP0|#ed0af64f-46ea-4682-8bef-ddaf2887c6b2;L0|#0ed0af64f-46ea-4682-8bef-ddaf2887c6b2|Electricity Generation and Distribution Department
Fire and Rescue Service Department GP0|#f2b99fd6-37b1-4590-aace-f5152355d1c1;L0|#0f2b99fd6-37b1-4590-aace-f5152355d1c1|Fire services;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#60f2ecfc-5cbd-484a-bd2c-66c3aac9ccd0;L0|#060f2ecfc-5cbd-484a-bd2c-66c3aac9ccd0|fire brigade;GP0|#7d67a580-0f74-4c79-8abc-218350f90617;L0|#07d67a580-0f74-4c79-8abc-218350f90617|fire station;GP0|#46028cc0-d905-4d0d-b93d-2474492d4e36;L0|#046028cc0-d905-4d0d-b93d-2474492d4e36|Emergency call;GP0|#ff4292df-e4cb-4133-95d5-e9035896836c;L0|#0ff4292df-e4cb-4133-95d5-e9035896836c|emergency services;GP0|#30ed7e10-4c9b-499f-a30c-3cdc3fc9e6c8;L0|#030ed7e10-4c9b-499f-a30c-3cdc3fc9e6c8|Safety and Security Directorate;GP0|#0d8e6bd3-01a1-42b8-8f93-d87f4e7dadae;L0|#00d8e6bd3-01a1-42b8-8f93-d87f4e7dadae|search and rescue;GP0|#50532c45-566c-4d78-ad56-b170edc4d419;L0|#050532c45-566c-4d78-ad56-b170edc4d419|fire and life officers;GP0|#4dcb0ae7-f7de-4e45-ba19-c0ee87eaa35d;L0|#04dcb0ae7-f7de-4e45-ba19-c0ee87eaa35d|command and control staff;GP0|#0645d8ae-4b73-4d4a-a7a9-341605e31e29;L0|#00645d8ae-4b73-4d4a-a7a9-341605e31e29|fire prevention;GP0|#e05a2606-05ba-4ef0-a872-bdef1bb73997;L0|#0e05a2606-05ba-4ef0-a872-bdef1bb73997|fire inspections;GP0|#05d652f7-6778-4511-a8fd-de1af7f52c56;L0|#005d652f7-6778-4511-a8fd-de1af7f52c56|hazardous materials;GP0|#f58faf55-8582-420e-ac46-eeb2f05bc6e6;L0|#0f58faf55-8582-420e-ac46-eeb2f05bc6e6|firefighter
Metro Police DepartmentGP0|#b480eb1b-cfa8-45cf-ab3d-21f848f482e9;L0|#0b480eb1b-cfa8-45cf-ab3d-21f848f482e9|safety and security;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#4c0f0261-7596-44f3-8161-86d4bd32156d;L0|#04c0f0261-7596-44f3-8161-86d4bd32156d|Police services;GP0|#5dfd7a7b-84c9-4a6d-ab55-ff5d5f7e710b;L0|#05dfd7a7b-84c9-4a6d-ab55-ff5d5f7e710b|by-law enforcement;GP0|#2511a79d-ced9-4ca5-b161-3e9929266ea7;L0|#02511a79d-ced9-4ca5-b161-3e9929266ea7|Crime prevention;GP0|#04bebfed-49b9-406a-a75a-f7414f8d9bf8;L0|#004bebfed-49b9-406a-a75a-f7414f8d9bf8|CCTV surveillance;GP0|#fa398fa6-831f-4358-9c72-e9afa39997c9;L0|#0fa398fa6-831f-4358-9c72-e9afa39997c9|SAPS;GP0|#8a4b9ef0-0abd-4811-a93e-43b5fd20f3cb;L0|#08a4b9ef0-0abd-4811-a93e-43b5fd20f3cb|Substance Abuse;GP0|#10bf7f95-3ff8-40a2-a2bd-db5e41df6446;L0|#010bf7f95-3ff8-40a2-a2bd-db5e41df6446|Gangsterism;GP0|#ed10cb15-0530-4915-bc5c-b99f04417fc0;L0|#0ed10cb15-0530-4915-bc5c-b99f04417fc0|traffic law enforcement services;GP0|#1a546bcb-c1b0-428e-8480-5272917b4891;L0|#01a546bcb-c1b0-428e-8480-5272917b4891|canine unit;GP0|#377804c6-9c66-48b2-b50c-b2582824f5a2;L0|#0377804c6-9c66-48b2-b50c-b2582824f5a2|Drugs;GP0|#91e55ebd-5010-4ecf-8f4c-4260f6c9f9f0;L0|#091e55ebd-5010-4ecf-8f4c-4260f6c9f9f0|security awareness;GP0|#2f6c5b49-7298-4fc0-8d4a-c1f030f0fc92;L0|#02f6c5b49-7298-4fc0-8d4a-c1f030f0fc92|alcohol abuse

 

 

City affords 5 000 beneficiaries the opportunity to collect their title deeds<span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Cllr%20Little%20hands%20over%20title%20deeds%20to%20Leatitia%20Fuzani%20and%20Kenneth%20Mfanta%20wh.jpg" style="width:531px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The City of Cape Town is ready to issue 5 000 title deeds to beneficiaries living in Wallacedene, Wesbank, Mfuleni and Kalkfontein, which is testament to our commitment to empowering some of our most vulnerable residents as rightful property owners.</p><p>Over the past six years, the City has handed over thousands of title deeds to residents to ensure that they are confirmed as rightful property owners.</p><p>To date, nearly 4 000 beneficiaries in Wallacedene, Wesbank, Mfuleni and Kalkfontein have already received their title deeds. In addition, approximately 8 000 title deeds are in the process of being transferred to beneficiaries.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Linda%20Stanford%20shows%20his%20delight%20in%20receiving%20his%20title%20deed.jpg" style="width:535px;" /><figcaption><p>© City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span>The City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Area North, Councillor Suzette Little, and the Mayoral Committee Member for Area East, Councillor Anda Ntsodo, handed over the title deeds to the beneficiaries today, 26 July 2017. <br><p>‘Today’s handover is more than just a piece of paper. It is proof that our beneficiaries are the rightful owners of their properties and that their properties have become their financial assets. This needs to be celebrated. The transfer of ownership and handing over of title deeds is in line with the City’s commitment to redressing the imbalances of the apartheid past where people where denied ownership of property,’ said Councillor Little.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Cllr%20Ntsodo%20and%20group%20of%20beneficiaries.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p>© City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span></span>‘The City will continue to make every effort to ensure that beneficiaries receive their title deeds. The handover of title deeds is also a demonstration of realising the Organisational Development and Transformation Plan objectives to be a customer-centric administration and to build an inclusive city where everyone feels a sense of belonging. We trust that with their title deeds in their hands, our beneficiaries will now have the assurance that they belong and are the rightful owners of their properties,’ said Councillor Ntsodo.<p><br><strong></strong> </p><p><strong></strong> </p><p><strong>End </strong></p><span><span></span><p> </p>​​</span>2017-07-25T22:00:00Z1
City libraries turn over a renovated leaf<span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Ottery%20-%20After%203.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>A number of City libraries are due for mini-makeovers in the next year as part of the Library and Information Services Department’s renovations and maintenance programme.</p><p>During the past six months, 12 of the City’s libraries have been closed to allow for essential upgrades and renovation. The 12 libraries that have been completed are Delft South, Tokai, Masakhane, Moses Mabhida, Mfuleni, Kloof Street, Blouberg Strand, Tafelsig, Gugulethu, Bishop Lavis, Southfield and Eikendal.</p><p>The latest library to reopen after a near R4 million upgrade was the Eikendal Library. The library space was doubled; electrical wiring, telephones, an alarm system, and IT networks were upgraded; floor and roof coverings were replaced; and the building was given a fresh coat of paint. Ablution facilities were also upgraded, with the addition of toilets for people with disabilities.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Kuyasa%20lib.jpg" style="width:511px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure></span></span>‘The upgrade of Eikendal Library was in direct response to the popularity of this library and the immense demand for library services in this community. The City’s goal is to provide world-class facilities to all our communities and it starts with maintaining the ones we have. Libraries offer a space where people can keep their minds active. The fact that any person – young or old, rich or poor, employed or unemployed – can walk into a library and find information to educate and enrich themselves makes these facilities an essential part of community life,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.<p>Libraries that will close in the next year for upgrades include Fish Hoek, Observatory and Eerste River. Construction has also started on the multi-million rand Dunoon Library, which is due to open late next year.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Kloof%20-%20After%201.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span><p>‘The renovations may result in temporary inconvenience, but they are essential to ensure that our libraries remain spaces of information, social interaction and relaxation. We therefore appeal to affected patrons to please bear with us while the renovations are under way. We want communities to be proud of their facilities and ensure that these assets are used optimally by residents,’ said Alderman Smith.</p><p>During the 2016/2017 financial year, planned maintenance projects for libraries were completed to the value of R6,9 million, while the planned budget for this year is R7,8 million. Maintaining and upgrading facilities is in line with the City’s Organisational Development and Transformation Plan which aims to ensure that all residents have access to quality facilities which can help to build integrated communities.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p><p><br> </p><span><span></span><p> </p>​​</span>2017-07-25T22:00:00Z1
Mayoral Committee approves City’s first inner-city transitional housing project<p>​The City of Cape Town will commence with its very first inner-city transitional housing project once Council has approved the proposal later this week. The development will be located in Salt River, less than 5 km from the Cape Town central business district.</p><p>The City’s Mayoral Committee this afternoon, 25 July 2017, recommended to Council that the Pickwick site, located on the corner of Pickwick and Copperfield Roads in Salt River, be developed for transitional or semi-permanent housing.</p><p>One of the City’s social housing partners will commence with the proposed development once Council has approved the proposal at its Council meeting on Thursday, 27 July 2017.</p><p>The development of the Pickwick site represents a new approach in terms of how the City intends to tackle the urgent demand for housing by those families who are displaced or evicted from their homes due to rapid development, among others. </p><p>When the Transport and Urban Development Authority (TDA) was established in January this year, we said that the City has turned a corner in our approach to affordable housing. </p><p>Part of the undertaking is to, within our means, provide those who are facing emergency situations with safe, decent, and affordable temporary housing as close as possible to where they are working, or at least as close as possible to where they can get onto a bus, train or minibus-taxi. </p><p>I told Council during my budget speech in May this year that the City has put an end to the development of so-called temporary relocation areas – or TRAs – on the outskirts of the city, far away from jobs and other opportunities.</p><p>The Pickwick Transitional Housing Project confirms our intent to honour this commitment. It is the first development to provide transitional housing in the inner city, and will be funded from the TDA’s Communal Residential Unit budget.</p><p>The estimated cost is R11,1 million to develop a facility with 42 rooms and 85 beds, communal bathrooms and kitchens, as well as access control to ensure the safety of those residing in the facility.</p><p>The facility will be developed on City-owned land. Once completed, a private non-profit agency will be contracted to manage the facility on behalf of the City. </p><p>The development will provide households who have been displaced or evicted from their homes with temporary or semi-permanent housing while opportunities for permanent housing are procured. </p><p>Those living in the facility will sign lease agreements and pay monthly rent based on what they can afford. The City will subsidise the operational costs through its Rental Indigent Scheme applicable to Council tenants. </p><p>I also want to confirm that there are more transitional housing projects in the pipeline – in Salt River, as well as in other areas in Cape Town. Our officials are conducting an audit of City-owned land parcels in Goodwood and Bellville. We will confirm the locations once we have established that the potential sites are suitable to include transitional housing.</p><p>Last week I announced that we have identified 10 City-owned sites in the city centre, Salt River and Woodstock to be used for affordable housing opportunities for those who need it most. </p><p>Three of these sites – two erven along Pine Road and six erven along Dillon Lane and the Salt River Market in Albert Road – have already been allocated to social housing institutions. The statutory land-use applications are under way and we expect construction to commence in due course. </p><p>Apart from sites intended for transitional housing and social housing mentioned above, we have also identified five City-owned land parcels for the development of affordable housing opportunities in Salt River, Woodstock, and the inner city. </p><p>We are moving away from a piecemeal development approach towards a Precinct Development Approach which is to be applied first in these inner-city areas. This is a strategic change in line with the City’s transit-oriented development strategic framework that emphasises the need for densification and intensification in transit-accessible precincts – thus, well-located precincts that are close to public transport and employment opportunities.</p><p>Importantly, from now on the City will also apply an investment-like approach, where appropriate, in developing City-owned sites for housing opportunities.</p><p>This means we will, as is the case with the Foreshore Freeway Precinct, make City-owned land parcels available to prospective bidders from the private sector for development.</p><p>The prospectus for the development of the five sites in the city centre, Woodstock and Salt River will be issued within the next two months, save to say that it will encourage ‘tenure-blind’ affordable housing developments where the design of the overall development is integrated into the surrounding area and does not distinguish between the differences in income and tenure within the development.</p><p>We want these developments to offer a mixture of affordable housing typologies, including social housing, combined with market-related housing (for those who can pay). </p><p>In some instances, we would also encourage mixed-use developments – thus, a combination of residential and retail and commercial units so that the business units can cross-subsidise the affordable housing units, in so doing ensuring the long-term sustainability of the development.</p><p>The details of the sites and all of the other information that bidders may need in devising and submitting their proposals will be presented in the prospectus. </p><p>Again, once issued, the approach will mirror the one that we have followed in the proposed development of the Foreshore Freeway Precinct.</p><p>The precinct-led development in Woodstock and Salt River is a pivotal introduction to a customer-centric approach to housing delivery in line with the City’s new Organisational Development and Transformation Plan. It is a new way of doing business which we will apply in all of the other precincts where we intend to provide affordable and inclusionary housing on City-owned land.</p><p>The prospectus will be a public document so that all residents and interested and affected parties can have access to all of the available information.</p><p><br><strong>End </strong><br></p>2017-07-24T22:00:00Z1
City warns of the lingering after-effects of drinking<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/WhatsApp%20Image%202017-07-14%20at%2009.25.53.jpeg" style="width:1364px;" /><figcaption> <p>  © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>City of Cape Town traffic officers netted eight motorists for drunk driving in Muizenberg, Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town early yesterday morning, 23 July 2017.</p><p>The arrests formed part of the random breath testing project currently under way. One of those arrested had a reading of 0,64 mg of alcohol per 100 ml of blood, which is nearly three times the legal limit.</p><p>‘I need to impress upon members of the public that the effects of the night before linger far longer than many might imagine. If you’ve had a hard night of drinking, rather steer clear of driving for a while longer to avoid the situation that these motorists were caught in. In the morning, some drivers are still affected by the significant alcohol consumed the night before. It is also worth noting that roadblocks are no longer middle-of-the-night occurrences, but happen around the clock and you can be caught at any time. So, if you’ve been drinking, don’t drive for at least 12 to 24 hours afterwards,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.</p><span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/WhatsApp%20Image%202017-07-22%20at%2019.20.44.jpeg" style="width:1023px;" /><figcaption> <p>   © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure></span></span><p>In addition to the eight arrests in the south peninsula, traffic officers arrested 101 motorists at five roadblocks over the weekend in Somerset West, Maitland, Woodstock, Kuils River and Langa.</p><p>Various operations focusing on illegal drag-racing in the Bellville area saw seven arrests for drunk driving and six for reckless and negligent driving. In the southern peninsula, 12 motorists were arrested for outstanding warrants, 68 warrants were served, and 16 motorists were released on a warning. </p><p>During a taxi operation in Bellville, officers impounded four vehicles and issued just over 200 fines for various transgressions. They also arrested a taxi driver for drunk driving.</p><p>Metro Police arrested 20 drunk drivers during their weekend operations, but the biggest success came in Hanover Park on Sunday, 23 July 2017 when the Gang and Drug Task Team spotted a suspect who started running as soon as he saw the officers. They gave chase and, during the pursuit, the suspect threw something over a wall. They caught the suspect and when they went back to the spot where he disposed of the items he had in his possession, officers found nine .45 mm rounds of ammunition and arrested the 18-year-old. </p><p><span>​ </span>Officers then received a tip-off from the public that led them to a house in the area. A search of a bungalow in the backyard revealed a .38 Taurus revolver, 32 x .38 special rounds of ammunition, and 10 rounds of shotgun ammunition. The officers also noticed that the soil in the yard had been disturbed and started digging. They found 200 dagga ‘stoppe’, 10 rounds of shotgun ammunition, nine .45 mm rounds of ammunition, 13 x  7.62 rounds of ammunition, 14 x  306 mm rounds of ammunition, two 9 mm pistol magazines, two rifle magazines, and 59 x .223 rifle rounds. A 42-year-old suspect was arrested for being in possession of unlicensed firearm, ammunition and drugs.</p><p>‘Metro Police have confiscated three firearms, a stash of ammunition, and various quantities of drugs in the last week. In many instances, the successes were the result of tip-offs from the community. We appeal to the public to continue blowing the whistle on criminal activities in their areas because often they know what is going on and who the culprits are and can provide valuable intelligence to aid our crime-fighting efforts. We also have our Informant Reward System for information that leads to arrests or the recovery of stolen goods or contraband, so there is some incentive for the public too,’ added Alderman Smith.</p><p>In the last 12 months, 18 payments totalling just over R10 000 were made for information that led to the recovery of stolen vehicles, a firearm, ammunition, various quantities of drugs, and illegally fished rock lobster.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p><p> </p><span><span></span><p> </p>​​</span>2017-07-23T22:00:00Z1

 

 

 

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