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Water and Sanitation DepartmentGP0|#ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172;L0|#0ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172|water demand management;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#5ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e;L0|#05ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e|water management services;GP0|#1e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4;L0|#01e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4|sanitation services;GP0|#5d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3;L0|#05d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3|Water management device;GP0|#e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb;L0|#0e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb|water quality management;GP0|#8f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567;L0|#08f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567|water restrictions;GP0|#6c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6;L0|#06c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6|water services;GP0|#3d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024;L0|#03d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024|sewer network;GP0|#d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586;L0|#0d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586|Utility services;GP0|#d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd;L0|#0d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd|potable water;GP0|#40fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a;L0|#040fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a|meter reading;GP0|#b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24;L0|#0b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24|scientific services;GP0|#a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5;L0|#0a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5|wastewater system;GP0|#cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03;L0|#0cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03|water installation;GP0|#da4d6418-6b72-42af-93bf-02f108193161;L0|#0da4d6418-6b72-42af-93bf-02f108193161|Level 3b Water restrictions;GPP|#90b49a62-96e2-436a-9c68-187c9ab33534
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Fire and Rescue Service Department GP0|#f2b99fd6-37b1-4590-aace-f5152355d1c1;L0|#0f2b99fd6-37b1-4590-aace-f5152355d1c1|Fire services;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#60f2ecfc-5cbd-484a-bd2c-66c3aac9ccd0;L0|#060f2ecfc-5cbd-484a-bd2c-66c3aac9ccd0|fire brigade;GP0|#7d67a580-0f74-4c79-8abc-218350f90617;L0|#07d67a580-0f74-4c79-8abc-218350f90617|fire station;GP0|#46028cc0-d905-4d0d-b93d-2474492d4e36;L0|#046028cc0-d905-4d0d-b93d-2474492d4e36|Emergency call;GP0|#ff4292df-e4cb-4133-95d5-e9035896836c;L0|#0ff4292df-e4cb-4133-95d5-e9035896836c|emergency services;GP0|#30ed7e10-4c9b-499f-a30c-3cdc3fc9e6c8;L0|#030ed7e10-4c9b-499f-a30c-3cdc3fc9e6c8|Safety and Security Directorate;GP0|#0d8e6bd3-01a1-42b8-8f93-d87f4e7dadae;L0|#00d8e6bd3-01a1-42b8-8f93-d87f4e7dadae|search and rescue;GP0|#50532c45-566c-4d78-ad56-b170edc4d419;L0|#050532c45-566c-4d78-ad56-b170edc4d419|fire and life officers;GP0|#4dcb0ae7-f7de-4e45-ba19-c0ee87eaa35d;L0|#04dcb0ae7-f7de-4e45-ba19-c0ee87eaa35d|command and control staff;GP0|#0645d8ae-4b73-4d4a-a7a9-341605e31e29;L0|#00645d8ae-4b73-4d4a-a7a9-341605e31e29|fire prevention;GP0|#e05a2606-05ba-4ef0-a872-bdef1bb73997;L0|#0e05a2606-05ba-4ef0-a872-bdef1bb73997|fire inspections;GP0|#05d652f7-6778-4511-a8fd-de1af7f52c56;L0|#005d652f7-6778-4511-a8fd-de1af7f52c56|hazardous materials;GP0|#f58faf55-8582-420e-ac46-eeb2f05bc6e6;L0|#0f58faf55-8582-420e-ac46-eeb2f05bc6e6|firefighter
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City pounds crush cars to lighten the load<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/crusher3.JPG" style="width:431px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The City of Cape Town’s Traffic Service has crushed 73 vehicles that have been gathering dust at its vehicle impound facilities. </p><p>The operation, which took place on Wednesday and Thursday last week, was the second of its kind, following the destruction of 48 sedan taxi in 2015. </p><p>This time around, the vehicles comprised sedans and minibuses that did not make the cut for auction, given that they are old, in a dilapidated condition, and not roadworthy.</p><p>The City’s two vehicle impound facilities in Ndabeni and Maitland are currently home to approximately 750 vehicles. Vehicles are impounded for various reasons, including where public transport operators carry passengers without valid operating permits or operate contrary to the conditions of their permits, or if the vehicles are found to be abandoned.</p><p>Regulation 320 of the National Road Traffic Act allows for the disposal of vehicles left abandoned at a traffic premises for longer than 21 days. Vehicles can be auctioned and in November 2016, the City sold 106 vehicles in this manner; however, those that are not roadworthy are disposed of by a contractor appointed to crush and compact the vehicles.</p><p>‘We have to dispose of vehicles that have been abandoned because vehicle impoundments happen on a daily basis and our two pounds are taking strain. Impound release fees are set at a stepped tariff rate and we believe motorists simply cannot afford to reclaim a vehicle that has been impounded a second or third time, which means the strategy is working. As the saying goes “wie nie hoor nie, moet voel”,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/crusher2.jpg" style="width:431px;" /><figcaption> <p>          © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> On Tuesday 14 February 2017, traffic officers held an operation in Table View where they impounded 16 taxis and issued 520 fines. They also arrested 12 suspects – one for reckless and negligent driving and 11 for outstanding warrants. A total of 115 warrants were served and 19 motorists were released on a warning.<p>Other traffic enforcement successes for the week of 13 to 18 February included:<br><br>• 121 arrests for outstanding warrants, 839 warrants served, and 266 motorists released on a warning<br>• 13 arrests for reckless and negligent driving <br>• 20 arrests for driving under the influence of alcohol<br>• 2 290 fines for various offences.</p><p>The City’s Metro Police Department netted 72 suspects for various offences during their operations in the last week, including 24 motorists for drunk driving, 41 arrests for drug offences, six for possession of suspected stolen property, and one wanted for murder.</p><p>A number of the drug arrests were made as a result of information received about illegal activities taking place at various properties in Mitchells Plain, Kraaifontein, Ocean View, Milnerton and Macassar. One of the suspects, aged 22, was searched in front of his residence in Macassar on Monday 13 February. Officers confiscated 38 dagga ‘stoppe’, 76 ‘bankies’ of dagga, two blue City of Cape Town refuse bags containing dagga, and R875 in cash.</p><p>Overall, the Metro Police Department confiscated various quantities of drugs including dagga, tik, khat and cocaine as well as just under R12 000 in cash.</p><p>It was also ‘game-over’ for a 34-year-old suspect who peddled unga on the corner of Plein and Darling Streets in the Cape Town CBD, right under the watchful gaze of CCTV camera operators on Wednesday 15 February. The operators alerted the Central City Improvement District who dispatched staff and caught the suspect with 334 units of unga in his possession. He was arrested by the South African Police Service and taken to Cape Town Central Police Station.</p><p>‘Arrests like these should sound a warning to criminals and embolden communities to speak out about illegal activities in their neighbourhoods. We don’t always have the manpower to respond immediately, but the fact is that we are responding where we can and we are reaping the results. More than half of the arrests made by Metro Police in the last week were for drug offences – the bulk of which came about because of community tips. I commend those members of the public who spoke up and lifted the lid on wrongdoing in their streets. We need more of them,’ added Alderman Smith.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p></span>​​</span>2017-02-19T22:00:00Z1
City’s water crisis warning on freeway signs goes live<p>​As from this week, the City has adjusted its water consumption target downwards from 800 million litres to 700 million litres for collective water usage per day. Reducing consumption remains a key intervention during a time of severe drought, as Cape Town is currently experiencing. </p><p>‘It means that if we all use approximately 40% less water every day, compared with what we usually use during unrestricted times, about 1,2 billion litres per day, we will have 135 days left of water. If we save more, we’ll have water for more days. Seasonal changes would also increase the number of days, such as good rainfall and lower evaporation rates of the dams as it becomes cooler.</p><p>‘The current situation is that we have not met the previous target of 800 million litres per day. This is reducing the actual number of days of water that we have left. The closer we stay to and below the new target of 700 million litres per day, the more days of water we will have left. </p><p>‘This message on the signboards is the latest in our myriad attempts to literally drive the message home that we need to reduce consumption now. It is the best contingency measure that we have. </p><p>‘Our signs, indicating how much water we could have left at our current consumption rates are a stern call to action. Although we thank all of our great water ambassadors out there, we need all residents, businesses and government spheres to heed this call. There now really is no escaping the message,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services; and Energy, Councillor Xanthea Limberg. </p><p>Dam levels as at 13 February 2017 were at 36,2%. With the last 10% of a dam’s water not being useable, dam levels are effectively at approximately 26,2%. </p><p>Cape Town is in a water-scarce region and at all times, but especially during this water crisis, we need to use water sparingly. </p><p>While the City’s regular enforcement blitzes continue, the City’s Executive Mayor, Patricia de Lille, has also started to visit some high water consumers. If their consumption is not lowered immediately, measures will be taken to force consumption downwards. </p><p>From next week, the City’s area-based mayoral committee members will be following Mayor De Lille’s example and visiting the properties of high consumers personally. </p><p>As of Monday 20 February 2017, the identities of all customers who pay admission-of-guilt fines or who appear in court regarding contravention of Level 3B water restrictions will be made public by the City of Cape Town. </p><p>Meanwhile, Mayor De Lille and the Executive Deputy Mayor, Alderman Ian Neilson, continue to call businesses, hotels and government departments to engage with them about their water consumption. </p><p>Residents can contact the City via email to <a href="mailto:water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za">water.restrictions@capetown.gov.za</a> for queries or to report contraventions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts) or they can send an SMS to 31373.</p><p>For further information, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: <a href="http://www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater">www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater</a></p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p>2017-02-18T22:00:00Z1
City’s fibre-optic network passes the 800 km mark<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/fibre.jpg" style="width:514px;" /><figcaption> <p>   © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The fibre-optic cables installed by the City now have a combined length of 848 km – long enough to reach all the way to George and back. This includes fibre-optic cabling used to connect the City’s buildings, as well as bus stations, cameras and other infrastructure that is vital for service delivery. </p><p>Many of the City’s buildings where residents queue for services feature public Wi-Fi zones. In addition to the City’s libraries, fibre now connects 61 of the City’s clinics and 378 other buildings, including 61 privately owned office buildings.</p><p>Over 200 000 unique users connect to the internet every month using one of these Wi-Fi zones. Each person can use up to 100 MB of data each day for free. </p><p>Since the City’s public Wi-Fi project started, 1 051 239 people have made use of the Wi-Fi zones to connect to the internet. Much of this public use has been at the City’s 103 libraries, which have provided fixed SmartCape computers since 2002. Now library members can also connect using their own phones or other personal mobile devices at the libraries. The SmartCape Wi-Fi service has also been extended to about 100 other City facilities.</p><span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/smart%20cape.jpg" style="width:1044px;" /><figcaption> <p>  © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure><p>‘We are committed to upping the ante in terms of basic service delivery. The digital age presents enormous opportunities for the development of individuals and communities to improve their quality of life. The City is therefore of the view that digital access is a basic service and no longer a privilege. We are committed to achieving universal access to the internet as part of our service delivery standard. This will ensure that residents are given the opportunity to reap the benefits of the digital age,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Corporate Services, Councillor Raelene Arendse.</p><p>Looking ahead to 2021, the City’s broadband project will by then deliver a fully functional, municipal-owned fibre-optic network that will serve the entire metro area. This network will meet the City’s own needs for telecommunications services as well as provide infrastructure for commercial operators and other government entities, especially in areas which are not conventionally attractive to the private sector. </p><p>The City has made large investments in Khayelitsha, Mitchells Plain, Atlantis, Kuils River and other areas, and we will use this network infrastructure to roll out more Wi-Fi zones.</p><p>The City’s Telecommunications Department is committed to connecting 60 new Wi-Fi zones per year through to 2021, which will bring the total number to over 400 zones using more than 1 000 access points. </p><span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/fibre%20benefiting%20all.jpg" style="width:511px;" /><figcaption> <p>  © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure></span></span></span><p>‘The numbers speak for themselves. I can confidently say that we are getting on with building the most digitally connected city in Africa as we have acknowledged that digital inclusion is a vital component of basic service delivery. As we continue to extend the fibre-optic route, we expect the number of monthly users to grow to over half a million unique users per month, which will have a real social and economic impact.</p><p>‘The City’s fibre to privately-owned office buildings is leased by commercial service providers who use it to bring a high-speed broadband service to their business tenants. We predict that the number of commercial connections will increase significantly in the coming years as the City embarks on a project later this year to connect all buildings in the Cape Town central business district,’ said Councillor Arendse.</p><p>The impact on broadband availability in the CBD will be huge. Everyone who makes their way to the city centre, either to work or play, will benefit from the Wi-Fi zones that will be established in various public spaces.</p><p>Currently the City’s fibre-optic metro area network depends on 27 exchanges or switching facilities. Eventually Cape Town will have 68 such facilities of varying sizes that will be connected by over 1 300 km of cabling. </p><p>Apart from the City itself, one of the largest users of these exchanges is a cellphone network operator that uses the City’s network to provide high-speed LTE services (a 4G mobile communications standard) in several areas where it would have otherwise been difficult for the operator to do so. Additionally, this brings in additional revenue for the City.</p><p>The City’s current fibre-optic construction project is laying cables to Atlantis via Milnerton and to Somerset West, where a new switching exchange is being built. All of the libraries, clinics and other municipal buildings in these areas will then connect to this cabling which will push up the efficiency of the City’s communications and service delivery management capacity even further.</p><p>Other new switching facilities due for completion this year are those at Lookout Hill in Khayelitsha and the fire station in Durbanville. </p><p>‘Our commitment to providing services equitably throughout the metro is clear. Every clinic, library and public building will offer a high-speed, fibre-based broadband Wi-Fi service, no matter where it is located,’ added Councillor Arendse.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p>2017-02-17T22:00:00Z1
Dog owners’ tricks keep City’s Animal Control Unit on its toes<span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/owner%20and%20dog.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p>  © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The City of Cape Town’s Animal Control Unit dealt with 443 complaints in the second half of 2016 – the majority of which involved dog attacks. According to statistics, 60% of the cases related to attacks on humans and the rest were attacks on other dogs. During the period, the Unit impounded 136 dogs and opened 70 case dockets for investigation.</p> <p>Barking complaints are enforced by general Law Enforcement staff, with the Animal Control Unit only becoming involved once all avenues have been exhausted to address a complaint. </p> <p>‘One of the problems that the Animal Control Unit faces is that many complainants demand action, but then withdraw charges as soon as they receive compensation. So our staff members spend an inordinate amount of time compiling case dockets which require affidavits, medical reports, and photographic evidence (among others) only to have it all fall apart. It’s a waste of time and precious resources that we can ill afford,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.</p> <span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/dog.jpg" style="width:1023px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span></span>The City’s Animal By-law of 2010 covers a number of aspects, including the number of dogs allowed per household, responsibilities of dog owners in ensuring the animal’s health and wellbeing, and other prohibitions relating to the keeping of dogs. The full by-law is available here: <a href="http://tinyurl.com/zpbou29">http://tinyurl.com/zpbou29</a><p>‘The by-law is straightforward and includes a number of things one would assume to be common sense, but experience has proved otherwise. Animal welfare and public safety are both very important considerations and that is why we are working ever closer with the animal welfare sector. However, just because a dog is well cared for, if it poses a threat to public safety the owner must take responsibility for keeping it fenced in or on a leash when out in public. You can’t know with certainty that your dog won’t bite someone and saying so does little to put others at ease. So just do the right thing and follow the rules like everyone else,’ added Alderman Smith.</p><p>Free-running dogs are a particular concern, both in residential areas and public open spaces – especially beaches. The Animal By-law clearly stipulates that no dog is allowed to be in a public place except on a lease and under control unless the dog is in an area designated by the City as a free-running area. Owners should also not allow vicious or dangerous dogs to be in any public street or place unless the dog is humanely muzzled, held on a leash, and under control. </p><p>‘Dog owners run a number of risks by allowing their dogs to run free in this manner. There’s the risk of the dog attacking a person or another animal, not to mention the risk of the dog possibly being run over, or worse, stolen to be sold or used for dog-fighting purposes. Should our staff come across an unsupervised dog with no form of identification, they are compelled to impound the dog. The same goes for beaches with a prohibition on dogs. The seashore regulations empower the Animal Control Unit to summarily impound the dog. So I appeal to dog owners to please abide by the law and look after their animals for their own sake, but also the safety of others,’ added Alderman Smith.</p><p>The Animal Control Unit has also received a number of complaints about unregistered kennels and other animals for which permits are required. The Unit is working closely with the Cape of Good Hope SPCA to address the illegal sale of puppies at intersections.The City urges the public not to buy dogs in this manner and to report such incidents to the Public Emergency Communication Centre by calling <a>021 480 7700</a> from a cellphone or <a>107</a> from a landline.    <br></p> <span> <p> <strong>End </strong></p>​​</span>2017-02-16T22:00:00Z1