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City puts neighbourhood watches in the express lane with crime dispatch systemOver the last decade, the City has invested millions of rands in developing neighbourhood watch organisations <p>​Hundreds of members from 79 neighbourhood watch organisations around the city now have quicker access to professional assistance and are able to relay incidents and request emergency assistance much faster, thanks to an application which allows for an easier flow of information between members and the City of Cape Town’s control centre.</p><span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/IMG_5288.jpg" style="width:511px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure><p>It is anticipated that as the system is refined and the interaction between the uniformed services and neighbourhood watch organisations improves, many more neighbourhood watches will be brought on board so that none of the estimated 50 000 neighbourhood watch members are left out of the loop.</p><p>Over the last decade, the City has invested millions of rands in developing neighbourhood watch organisations through training of thousands of patrollers, recruiting neighbourhood watch patrollers into the Law Enforcement Auxiliary Service (the City’s own police reservist force), partnering with neighbourhood watches to install and share information between CCTV camera networks, and providing equipment like jackets, torches and bicycles, hand radios and radio base stations for their watch rooms.</p><span><figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/IMG_5291.jpg" style="width:1142px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure></span></span><p>The City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith, demonstrated the dispatch system earlier today. The system comprises two elements: base radios and, more recently, various applications such as WhatsApp, Link and Telegram.</p><p>‘We are currently using the City’s Tetra radio network to communicate with 14 cluster radio base sets across the city. The cluster base sets are strategically placed and surrounding neighbourhood watches have contact with the base set control centre. The centre is able to evaluate an incident reported and can call upon the Safety and Security Radio Communications Centre to assist with the emergency services needed, such as Metro Police, Traffic or Law Enforcement. Even the Metro EMS service is located there and now readily available to the neighbourhood watches,’ said Alderman Smith. </p><p>The Tetra radio system base radios were installed early in 2016 and have been operational since September 2016.</p><p>Neighbourhood watch organisations that have access to the system include those based in Gugulethu, Bellville, Atlantis, Durbanville, Bergvliet, Strand/Somerset West, Blue Downs, Mitchells Plain, Hout Bay, the Cape Town CBD, Parklands and Melkbosstrand.</p><p>The Telegram application was introduced in May this year and is also used for information flow to or from 79 neighbourhood watches to the radio control centre. The radio control centre also monitors existing neighbourhood watch operational chat groups on WhatsApp and Link.<br><br><span>​</span></p><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/IMG_5295.jpg" style="width:495px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure>‘The Wesbank Neighbourhood Watch stopped a young woman from being raped just days after they started using the app. While they were helping her, the members themselves came under attack. They were able to contact the control room directly and quickly, which meant help arrived timeously for all involved.<p> </p><p>‘Our neighbourhood watches are our eyes and ears and they ensure a visible presence and security in the communities they serve. These members are patrolling their neighbourhoods and keep the Safety and Security Radio Communications Centre up to date with any activity occurring in their area. The advantage of the new system is that neighbourhood watch members are not alone when they are patrolling the streets and they know there is backup and professional help should anything occur that is beyond their capacity,’ said Alderman Smith.</p><p>The neighbourhood watch radio system is monitored 24 hours.</p><p>‘A key priority of the City’s Organisational Development and Transformation Plan is the use of technology to optimise service delivery. We want to ensure that our neighbourhood watches have access to technology that will make their jobs easier, which in turn helps to ensure the safety of their communities.</p><p>‘Through this intervention, the neighbourhood watches become extensions of the City’s policing services, expanding the eyes and ears of the police and emergency services and allowing us to be readily at hand to support them when they need help,’ said Alderman Smith.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p><span><p><span></span> </p><p> </p>​​</span><p> </p>2017-08-15T22:00:00Z1
City moves to restrict high consumption households with water management devices City of Cape Town’s Water Inspectorate in officially kicking off the installation of water management devices to restrict high consumption households across Cape Town<p>​Today, 16 August 2017,  I joined the City of Cape Town’s Water Inspectorate in officially kicking off the installation of water management devices to restrict high consumption households across Cape Town. </p><p>The latest measure as part of our drought interventions comes as all households consuming over 20 000 litres per month were warned to reduce their consumption. Inspectors began visiting the users in excess of 60 000 litres per month and issued further warnings.</p><p>In July, as part of Level 4B water restrictions, the City issued a directive in terms of the Water By-law which empowers the City to install water management devices on premises where the water usage is unjustifiably excessive with respect to the restriction level.</p><p>The directive stated that in the event of non-compliance with Level 4b water restrictions and the 87 litres per person per day target, the City will, in terms of Section 36(4) of the By-law, at its discretion, install water management devices at premises where non-compliance is occurring. </p><p>Water management devices will be installed at households where high consumption cannot be justified or has not been rectified despite warnings. </p><p>During July and August, the City sent letters to approximately 21 500 households warning them that if their excessive use was not corrected and justified, we would be installing water management devices. </p><p>Water management devices will be installed at properties where more than seven working days have been allowed for action to be taken by the customer. </p><p>The property owner will be billed for the installation of the water management device at cost of between R4 560 and R4 732.</p><p>Of the 21 500 letters that have been sent so far, only 281 households wrote back to the City to request a quota extension, meaning they have more than four people on their property and require an allocation higher than the 350 litre per day allocation for the households. These requests will be evaluated by the Water Inspectorate. </p><p>Households will be restricted to 350 litres per day and where there is more than the average number of four people per household, as justified in the application made to the City to increase their quota, the City will set the water meter to a daily target that would allow each person to use their 87 litres per day in line with Level 4b restrictions.</p><p>Today we installed water management devices at two properties: one in Constantia and one in Claremont. These households’ water usage over the past six months ranged between 60 000 and 120 000 litres per month. This means that on average the daily consumption of these households was between 2 000 and 3 300 litres per day. </p><p>This is extremely unfair to the majority of residents who are saving water as we are in a severe drought and we have not received our usual winter rains. </p><p>The Water Inspectorate is continuing with the installation of water management devices at high consumption households every day over the next few weeks. </p><p>The City reminds households that it is the property owner’s duty to detect and repair water leaks.  </p><p>We have issued more than enough warnings and pleaded with residents to reduce consumption, but there are still too many people who continue to flout water restrictions. </p><p>We thank the many Capetonians who have employed numerous simple and innovative ways to save water. They have helped us to stretch our reserves and continue to make a great impact in terms of the overall water saving efforts. </p><p>But the time for asking people to reduce excessive consumption is over and we will now forcibly restrict those households who continue to contravene water restrictions.</p><p>This is a clear warning to all of the other households who continue to use water as normal or fail to check for and repair leaks on their properties. With drought as the New Normal, we need a drastic change in our behaviour and this requires everyone to do their part. </p><p>I will be making further announcements on the City’s Water Resilience Plan at my office tomorrow in terms of the alternative water sources the City will be tapping into over the short- to medium-term to augment our water supplies and avoid acute water shortages. </p><p>Saving water remains the most impactful and cost-effective intervention and so I appeal to all residents to continue saving water while we still have water to be saved. We have to do all we can to prevent our dam levels from dropping to extremely dangerous levels and this can only happen if we work together.</p><span><div class="image-gallery-slider img-gal-1" id="img-gal-1" data-slide="1" data-slides="3" style="height:493.5px;"><div class="image-gallery-content" style="height:414px;">​​​​ <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-1"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/_BES9098.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p>  Officially kicking off the installation of water management devices </p> </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-2"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/_BES8961.jpg" alt="" style="width:2010px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p>  Officially kicking off the installation of water management devices</p> </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-3"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/_BES9047.jpg" alt="" style="width:1153px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p>  Officially kicking off the installation of water management devices</p> </figcaption> </figure> </div><div class="image-gallery-control"><div class="image-gallery-caption"><p> <a title="title" href="#"> <b>Aerial view of Cape Town</b></a> - Loren ipsum dolor sit amet loren ipsum dolor sit amet Loren ipsum dolor sit amet.</p></div><div class="image-gallery-nav"><div class="nav-info">1 of 3</div><div class="slide-next"> <i class="icon arrow-white-next"></i> </div><div class="slide-prev"> <i class="icon arrow-white-prev"></i>​</div></div></div></div>​​</span><p><br><strong>End</strong> </p>2017-08-15T22:00:00Z1
City switches on electricity in Madiba Square in Imizamo YethuThe City is currently busy with a broad range of works in Imizamo Yethu as part of the super-blocking project to deliver services<p>Today, 15 August 2017, the City of Cape Town is pleased to announce that we have switched on electricity in the first part of the fire-affected area in Madiba Square, Imizamo Yethu.</p><p>On 11 July, following a meeting with the community leadership, we announced that electricity would be switched on in the first section by 10 August 2017.</p><p>This project has taken three months to complete, of which 15 days was lost due to unrest in the area. I am, however, pleased that we were able to switch on electricity today, a few days after the initial timeline.</p><p>The City’s teams and contractors are working around the clock to ensure that we install services as part of the super-blocking process as soon as possible and that we catch up on work which was delayed by violent protests a few weeks ago.</p><p>I thank the community for their patience and assure them that we will continue doing all we can to proceed with all plans as quickly as possible.</p><p>The electrification programme is currently on schedule for installations and reinstallations to the affected residents.</p><p>In Madiba Square, a total budget of R6,75 million has been spent for the electrification of 181 dwellings, of which 14% are new connections and the remainder of the households are a reinstatement of connections for customers electrified before the fire.</p><p>Once the entire area has been electrified, the project will result in the electrification of more than 2 100 households, of which more than 80% will be new connections at a cost of R40 million.</p><p>The City is currently busy with a broad range of works in Imizamo Yethu as part of the super-blocking project to deliver services such as water, sanitation, electricity, wider pathways and roads in the fire-affected area.</p><p>The super-blocking project will enhance service delivery in the area and lead to greater access in order to help prevent a recurrence of the devastating fire which occurred in March this year.</p><p>Following the fire, the City immediately embarked on planning for the super-blocking project – a new initiative in the City of Cape Town to provide better services in areas where density and other restrictive conditions do not allow for the provision of individual serviced sites.</p><p>The super-blocking provides for blocks separated by roads and pedestrian corridors with electrification of individual structures and communal taps and toilets provided per block.</p><p>Road access, electrification, fire-breaks and fire hydrants are expected to significantly reduce fire risks.</p><p>This is in line with the City’s Organisational Development and Transformation Plan (ODTP) goals to be a responsive, proactive and customer-centric organisation and to work much more closely with communities in order to enhance service delivery.</p><p>In terms of the electrification programme, the City is working to achieve the following key milestones:</p><ul><li><div style="text-align:left;">Electrification of Madiba Square has been completed in August 2017</div></li><li><div style="text-align:left;">Electrification of Pipe Track below Road 5 will start in the next two weeks for completion within the next three months</div></li><li><div style="text-align:left;">Electrification of Shooting Range will start as soon as enough progress has been made by the civil contractor doing roadworks and walkways</div></li><li><div style="text-align:left;">Dontse Yakhe will start when there is sufficient progress with the construction of Road 1 and the walkways</div></li></ul><p>The community leaders are being updated regularly on the plan and remain on board as they have said that this is the type of consolidated plan they had been asking for.</p> <span> <div class="image-gallery-slider img-gal-1" id="img-gal-1" data-slide="1" data-slides="3" style="height:493.5px;"><div class="image-gallery-content" style="height:414px;">​​​​ <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-1"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/iy2.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p> <a title="title" href="#"><b></b></a>Switched on electricity in the first part of the fire-affected area in Madiba Square, Imizamo Yethu </p> </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-2"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/iy3.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:924px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p> Switched on electricity in the first part of the fire-affected area in Madiba Square, Imizamo Yethu </p> </figcaption> </figure> <figure class="itemSlide slide-left slide-3"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/iy1.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:948px;" /> <figcaption class="image-slide-text" style="display:none;"> <p> <b></b>Switched on electricity in the first part of the fire-affected area in Madiba Square, Imizamo Yethu </p> </figcaption> </figure> </div><div class="image-gallery-control"><div class="image-gallery-caption"> </div><div class="image-gallery-nav"><div class="nav-info">1 of 3</div><div class="slide-next"> <i class="icon arrow-white-next"></i> </div><div class="slide-prev"> <i class="icon arrow-white-prev"></i>​</div></div></div></div>​​</span> <p>This past weekend the City also held an intensive two-day workshop at the Cape Town Civic Centre with community stakeholders from Imizamo Yethu and the broader Hout Bay community where City officials from various departments updated attendees on the super-blocking plan and progress.</p><p>The workshop dealt with the scope of works and all deliverables, with substantive input received from the community.</p><p>I would like to reiterate our commitment to working with all community leaders and residents to ensure that we continue getting on with the work of service delivery and making progress possible together for the sake of all the fire-affected residents in Imizamo Yethu.</p><p> <br> <strong>End</strong></p>2017-08-14T22:00:00Z1
Strand Street Concourse opens to pedestrians as a thoroughfareThe major construction work of the 1 752 m² area has now been completed. This forms part of an overall revitalisation project for the concourse<span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/strand%20street3.jpg" style="width:511px;" /><figcaption> <p>  © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The Strand Street Concourse, owned by the City of Cape Town, is part of a broader network of underground walkways that serves as a critical pedestrian link between the Cape Town Station precinct and the St George’s Street, Woolworths, Old Mutual and the Golden Acre shopping malls. </p><p>The major construction work of the 1 752 m² area has now been completed. This forms part of an overall revitalisation project for the concourse.</p><p>‘The concourse allows for protected pedestrian movement across the busy Strand and Adderley Streets, with a number of exit points into the heart of the central business district. It is an integral thoroughfare to the CBD that allows pedestrians to move safely and avoid vehicular traffic. They are able to move quickly without having to take traffic lights into account to get across the busy intersection. In addition, the concourse offers protection from inclement weather conditions,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Assets and Facilities Management, Councillor Stuart Diamond.</p><p>The scope of work, which started in September 2016, included retiling of the entire area, installation of new shutter doors at all entrances, installation of new lighting, the replacement of all six escalators, as well as the design and construction of new escalator landings at street level to provide ease of access for pedestrians, among a whole host of other improvements.<br></p><span><p>​​​​​​‘At this stage the City services aren’t on site yet. Upon completion, public interface services will include two community courts, municipal pay points, and a centre management office, while offices to accommodate the City’s departments of Social Development, Building Development Management, and Environmental Management will be available down the line. These public interface offices will operate during normal working hours and will be closed from 22:00 to 06:00 daily for security reasons.</p> <figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/strand%20street%20gallery1.jpg" alt="" style="width:928px;" /> </figure><p>‘The Strand Street Concourse refit project ties in with the over-arching principle of the City’s Organisational Development and Transformation Plan to become a more customer-centric organisation. Thousands of residents make their way to the city centre on a daily basis and many previously made use of the concourse as a thoroughfare. It therefore makes perfect sense to have municipal services available within easy reach, thus taking services closer to our residents. I am sure that once the revamp has been completed, the pedestrians will be back in their numbers to make use of this public space again which will be a lot more comfortable than it was before,’ added Councillor Diamond.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/strand%20street2.jpg" style="width:511px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span>This project is also a fine example of how the City plans to manage its strategic assets in future.<p>‘The refit of the Strand Street Concourse is yet another exciting chapter in the story of the revitalisation of the Cape Town CBD. The upgrades serve as an important recognition of public transport users who travel from other parts of the metro on a daily basis,’ said Ward Councillor for Ward 115, Councillor Dave Bryant.</p><p><br> </p><p>End</p></span><p>​​</p></span><p> </p>2017-08-13T22:00:00Z1

 

 

 

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