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Defeating Day Zero is in sight if we sustain our water-saving effortsDay Zero, the day we may have to start queueing for water, has now moved to 9 July 2018.<p>Day Zero, the day we may have to start queueing for water, has now moved to 9 July due to a weekly drop in dam levels of only 0.5% (as compared to a 1.9% drop in 2014). This week’s lower rate of consumption can be attributed to the Groenland water reaching Steenbras Upper Dam last week and slightly increasing the dam level, as well as to a further reduction in Cape Town’s weekly average demand to 523 megalitres per day (MLD) compared to 1 130 MLD in 2014. </p><p>The Groenland water transfer and the reduction in our weekly average demand has had a dramatic impact on the Day Zero date, which is determined by assuming that the fortnightly trend of weekly dam storage change will continue unchanged. This precautionary outlook assumes no further rainfall and that water demand may not reduce over the next few months. It has been adopted to allow sufficient lead time for implementation of temporary water collection points in the event that these may be required.</p><p>We anticipate that Day Zero could move back into June again once the Groenland transfer has been completed, unless we are able to meet the 450 MLD collective water usage target. Therefore it is imperative that we reach this target to make it through to the winter rains.</p><p>Today I urge the residents of Cape Town not to ease up on their water-saving efforts. We cannot afford to slow down when the estimated Day Zero date moves out, simply because we cannot accurately predict the volume of rainfall still to come or when it will come. Last year we had abnormally low winter rainfall, and we cannot assume that this year will be any different.</p><p>The only way we can stretch our water supplies is to adhere to the 50 litres per person per day water allocation. Our water saving efforts across the metro have thus far been our greatest defence against Day Zero. Now is definitely not the time to ease up.</p><p>We once again want to thank the Groenland Water Users Farming Association for the water transfer, which made a considerable difference when we needed it most.</p><p>Our preparations for Day Zero continue as planned, along with the City’s aggressive roll-out of pressure management initiatives and the installation of water management devices at the properties of high users across the metro. Enforcement blitzes will also continue to ensure that all water users adhere to the water restrictions. </p><p>Latest water dashboard (<a href="http://coct.co/water-dashboard/" target="_blank">http://coct.co/water-dashboard/</a>)</p><ul><li> Day Zero: 9 July 2018 (was 4 June 2018) </li><li>Dam Levels: 24,4% (decline of 0,5%) </li><li> Total consumption: 523 million litres per day (73 million litres above the target of 450 million litres per day) </li><li> Percentage of Capetonians saving: *note, due to the implementation of 50 litre targets, this calculation is under review </li></ul><p>Level 6B restrictions make it compulsory for residents to use no more than 50 litres per person per day.</p><p>See the following link for the new tariff details: <a href="http://bit.ly/WaterTariff" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/WaterTariff</a></p><p>Please visit <a href="http://www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater" target="_blank">www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater</a> to see what a community water plan could look like community_water_plan for all water-related information, including Level 6B restrictions and regularly updated FAQs about Day Zero as well as tips to lower usage even further. </p><p>Also visit <a href="http://www.capetown.gov.za/watermap" target="_blank">www.capetown.gov.za/watermap</a> to see if your household is painting the city green to avoid Day Zero. </p><p> <strong>End</strong></p>2018-02-19T22:00:00Z1
City making progress on various projects to improve the lives of Mfuleni residentsOver 1 000 Mfuleni families will soon be moving into fully serviced plots as the City of Cape Town is making progress in the construction of the sites<span><p>​​​​​​I'm really pleased to report that over 1 000 Mfuleni families will soon be moving into fully serviced plots as the City of Cape Town is making progress in the construction of the sites.<br><br>Today I visited the site of the Mfuleni Extension 2 project where a contractor has been working hard over the last few months.<br>The project will deliver sites with water, sanitation and electricity for 1 043 families.</p> <figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Mfuleni1.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> </figure>​​</span><span><p>​​​​​​The contractor has already completed the bulk earthworks and is currently installing sewer and stormwater pipes along with manholes.<br><br>The project is due for completion by the end of the year.<br><br>The Mfuleni Extension 2 project was initiated in 2013 when the City signed an agreement with representatives from the community and a budget was already set aside to continue with the work.<br><br>However, work was halted in 2015 due to protests and vandalism. Since then, we have been working with residents, community leaders and councillors to ensure that we get this project up and running again.</p><p>The continuation of the project is as a result of great collaboration between the various players and I would like to thank those involved in making it happen.</p> <figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Mfuleni%202.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> </figure></span><span><p>The Extension 2 project is not being constructed in isolation and forms part of the City’s broader development of Mfuleni which includes a programme for 150 fully serviced sites to backyarders.  <br>A further 50 sites will be allocated to people with disabilities in Bardale, Mfuleni and surrounds.</p> <figure class="subtopic-fullsize-img"> <img class="responsive" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/mfuleni%203.jpg" alt="" style="width:948px;" /> </figure>​</span><p>When this process has been completed, the title deeds for the land will be transferred to the beneficiaries as the owners of the sites. <br>Other projects for the Mfuleni area include: </p><ul><li>The Blue Berry Hill Project which will deliver 3 500 housing opportunities </li><li>The electrification of 11 informal settlements in Mfuleni</li><li>Five People’s Housing Process (PHP) projects that will deliver 1 062 units have been approved and budget has been allocated</li><li>Installation of taps, gullies and toilets at seven informal settlements </li></ul><p>These projects underscore the City’s commitment to enhancing service delivery as intended by the Organisational Development Transformation Plan.<br><br>I have urged the community to keep up the good work relationships with subcouncil officials and the councillors to ensure we can implement this plan without delay.<br><br>From the City’s side, we are committed to working with residents to ensure that that these projects are a success and improve the lives of the intended beneficiaries.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong><br></p>2018-02-18T22:00:00Z1
Watershed ruling for Cape Town’s rivers, floodplains and wetlands The Western Cape High Court’s judgment in the Disa River case can be described as a watershed ruling for the preservation of Cape Town’s rivers, floodplains, and wetlands. <p>On 2 February 2018, World Wetlands Day, the Western Cape High Court ordered Really Useful Investments (Pty) Ltd, the developer of the Hout Bay Beach Club, to remove the material from the floodplain of the Hout Bay River, colloquially known as the Disa River, that was dumped there in 2011.<br><br> Really Useful Investments started infilling part of the wetland and floodplain of the Disa River in 2011 in order to develop its property, much to the ire of Hout Bay residents.<br><br> Although the land is privately owned, the court has found that infilling is in contravention of the City’s Stormwater Management By-law which prohibits land owners from dumping any material in a river, floodplain or wetland, or to reduce the capacity of the stormwater system (which includes floodplains) without the written consent of Council.<br><br> In April 2011, the City served a notice of contravention of the Stormwater Management By-law on the developer, which required it to immediately stop infilling into the floodplain of the Disa River and to remove the fill material that was placed within the floodplain. The City’s Environmental Management Department followed this with a directive in terms of the Environment Conservation Act which required that the fill material be removed from the floodplain. <br><br> Although Really Useful Investments at first indicated that it would comply with the directive, by late 2012 only a part of the wetland had been restored, and the fill material remained in stockpiles and spread out on the floodplain.<br><br> In 2014 the City commenced with court proceedings in an effort to force Really Useful Investments to comply fully with the notice and directive that had been served, while Really Useful Investments instituted its own court action in an attempt to claim compensation from the City. The compensation claim was dismissed by the Supreme Court of Appeal in 2015. <br><br> The City’s proceedings were delayed as both parties sought to find an amicable settlement, but when these efforts proved fruitless the City’s application was finally set down for hearing in court.<br><br> On 2 February 2018 judgment was handed down. The court declared the infilling of the floodplain to be in contravention of the Stormwater Management By-law. Furthermore, the court found that Really Useful Investments has failed to comply with the directive in terms of the Environment Conservation Act and directed them to do so within 45 days of the judgment.<br><br> Thus, the court has ordered Really Useful Investments to remove the soil, general rubble, and fill that was placed within the floodplain of the Disa River within 45 days. Should it not comply with the order, the City is authorised to enter the property and to remove the material, and to recover the costs from Really Useful Investments.<br><br> ‘The outcome of the Disa River case in the Western Cape High Court is a major victory for the City. We do all we can to protect rivers, wetlands and floodplains, particularly as these form an essential part of Cape Town’s natural environment and biodiversity,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.<br><br> ‘Furthermore, this judgment sends a strong message to developers that they should abide by the City’s policies and by-laws.<br><br> ‘The City’s Environmental Management Department has vigorously pursued this matter since 2011 given that protecting the wetland and floodplain of the Disa River is of extreme importance to the ecological health and functioning of the watercourse. Environmental Management will keep on monitoring the situation to ensure that Really Useful Investments abides by the court order, and that it does what is needed to restore the integrity of the Disa River,’ said Councillor Herron.<br><br> Really Useful Investments has also been directed to pay the City’s legal costs.</p><p><strong>End</strong></p>2018-02-18T22:00:00Z1
City advises of temporary road closures for the State of the Nation Address (SONA)To accommodate the State of the Nation Address and the opening of Parliament on Friday 16 February 2018<p>To accommodate the State of the Nation Address and the opening of Parliament on Friday 16 February 2018, the National Government and the South African Police Service (SAPS) have requested that extended road closures be effected in the city. </p><p>Roads, mostly in the CBD, will be closed from 06:00 to midnight on Friday 16 February 2018 to accommodate the State of the Nation Address.</p><p>The road closures will affect the normal flow of traffic in and around the city bowl, Newlands, and the M3 and N2 city-bound lanes. As such, road users are asked to plan their routes accordingly. </p><p>Road users are also alerted to the closure of the M3 and N2 at 17:45 on Friday. The M5 will be the best option as an alternative route. <br> <br>A detailed breakdown of the closures/restrictions and deviations is available on the City’s website: <a href="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre%20Assets/State%20Of%20the%20Nation%20Address-Road%20closures-16%20February%202018.pdf" target="_blank">http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre%20Assets/State%20Of%20the%20Nation%20Address-Road%<strong>20closures-16%20February%202018.pdf</strong></a></p><p> <strong>End</strong></p>2018-02-14T22:00:00Z1

 

 

 

 

 

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