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Water and Sanitation DepartmentGP0|#ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172;L0|#0ad37857b-6e6c-448f-848b-055b416f6172|water demand management;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#5ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e;L0|#05ad38c28-a659-4947-8e55-53d5936de02e|water management services;GP0|#1e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4;L0|#01e73a03c-2779-493f-a91b-50fe8970c9b4|sanitation services;GP0|#5d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3;L0|#05d92a457-4fc0-4eea-b710-4ba7537c3dd3|Water management device;GP0|#e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb;L0|#0e90b5501-d899-4848-a2e7-3dc910abb5bb|water quality management;GP0|#8f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567;L0|#08f0aed5b-4ba7-472c-92c5-c1c5bc737567|water restrictions;GP0|#6c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6;L0|#06c7b2dca-5ce3-4906-bc42-b0961c4333b6|water services;GP0|#3d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024;L0|#03d48f3aa-ea54-43d0-97c0-96a9d11d3024|sewer network;GP0|#d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586;L0|#0d03054f7-2f06-4482-a607-fa4c0dfee586|Utility services;GP0|#d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd;L0|#0d99d1ebb-c947-465c-8505-554500fdddbd|potable water;GP0|#40fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a;L0|#040fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a|meter reading;GP0|#b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24;L0|#0b1001203-6617-4993-8107-4871a2e6aa24|scientific services;GP0|#a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5;L0|#0a9dee0b3-e47a-4008-ac5e-3674b605c1b5|wastewater system;GP0|#cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03;L0|#0cb4ec3d5-69e0-48d5-834d-69b0850e4b03|water installation;GP0|#bfbcd1ff-7345-4ed6-92ef-4aefa57bf212;L0|#0bfbcd1ff-7345-4ed6-92ef-4aefa57bf212|wayleaves;GP0|#8fc58e15-8bcd-468f-b872-1e42c1feecbc;L0|#08fc58e15-8bcd-468f-b872-1e42c1feecbc|application
Library and Information Services DepartmentGP0|#1f61ec30-8889-4114-8411-a3ee8477bc1b;L0|#01f61ec30-8889-4114-8411-a3ee8477bc1b|Libraries;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#15a238d5-9c3f-4b92-8afe-0a94c12abc2f;L0|#015a238d5-9c3f-4b92-8afe-0a94c12abc2f|youth programmes;GP0|#94f093be-895d-4918-90c0-ce6de0dafbd3;L0|#094f093be-895d-4918-90c0-ce6de0dafbd3|Skills development;GP0|#371aca0c-30df-4276-b952-99fc5b47b3ef;L0|#0371aca0c-30df-4276-b952-99fc5b47b3ef|Library services;GP0|#3ccd3ca8-9e03-465d-b3f1-273b74000155;L0|#03ccd3ca8-9e03-465d-b3f1-273b74000155|Smart Cape;GP0|#5560faac-dee8-4ad9-bcba-042a2e91be64;L0|#05560faac-dee8-4ad9-bcba-042a2e91be64|mobile libraries
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Electricity Generation and Distribution DepartmentGP0|#f99e33ee-e68d-432c-9212-7baa2b129e1f;L0|#0f99e33ee-e68d-432c-9212-7baa2b129e1f|municipal service;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#5ca4d0f8-d954-4f76-b971-02dd94168205;L0|#05ca4d0f8-d954-4f76-b971-02dd94168205|utility service;GP0|#78ef77bd-ec89-4ecd-859e-699c88406437;L0|#078ef77bd-ec89-4ecd-859e-699c88406437|power supply;GP0|#15fe4006-3e63-4153-a48f-937a805d04f5;L0|#015fe4006-3e63-4153-a48f-937a805d04f5|planned outages;GP0|#be0d8956-cdb7-4809-be87-0ec2558803fa;L0|#0be0d8956-cdb7-4809-be87-0ec2558803fa|billing system;GP0|#40fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a;L0|#040fae32e-592f-4fca-8de1-5c3ebc94136a|meter reading;GP0|#f1032b58-94ee-4ddd-91bb-947149d777a1;L0|#0f1032b58-94ee-4ddd-91bb-947149d777a1|prepayment meter;GP0|#9b890b8d-9aea-40ec-9409-1d5794d35515;L0|#09b890b8d-9aea-40ec-9409-1d5794d35515|vendors;GP0|#8d25a44c-752c-4a86-bc47-c45a7cc51a26;L0|#08d25a44c-752c-4a86-bc47-c45a7cc51a26|Load shedding;GP0|#51472587-ca96-439b-b635-6bbe41cca04a;L0|#051472587-ca96-439b-b635-6bbe41cca04a|public lighting;GP0|#2be3882b-f597-49c7-8aa7-cdec50a5e39f;L0|#02be3882b-f597-49c7-8aa7-cdec50a5e39f|power station;GP0|#47a77d4c-1397-445d-8bec-584d00997158;L0|#047a77d4c-1397-445d-8bec-584d00997158|athlone gas turbine;GP0|#0e994e93-10d7-4d22-9cd5-ea3dd0048ffe;L0|#00e994e93-10d7-4d22-9cd5-ea3dd0048ffe|prepaid electricity;GP0|#f1632294-9271-4238-8f55-ec26d4425c63;L0|#0f1632294-9271-4238-8f55-ec26d4425c63|distribution network;GP0|#c939220c-f64a-463e-82d5-22b9981ccb0e;L0|#0c939220c-f64a-463e-82d5-22b9981ccb0e|Eskom;GP0|#ed0af64f-46ea-4682-8bef-ddaf2887c6b2;L0|#0ed0af64f-46ea-4682-8bef-ddaf2887c6b2|Electricity Generation and Distribution Department
Fire and Rescue Service Department GP0|#f2b99fd6-37b1-4590-aace-f5152355d1c1;L0|#0f2b99fd6-37b1-4590-aace-f5152355d1c1|Fire services;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#60f2ecfc-5cbd-484a-bd2c-66c3aac9ccd0;L0|#060f2ecfc-5cbd-484a-bd2c-66c3aac9ccd0|fire brigade;GP0|#7d67a580-0f74-4c79-8abc-218350f90617;L0|#07d67a580-0f74-4c79-8abc-218350f90617|fire station;GP0|#46028cc0-d905-4d0d-b93d-2474492d4e36;L0|#046028cc0-d905-4d0d-b93d-2474492d4e36|Emergency call;GP0|#ff4292df-e4cb-4133-95d5-e9035896836c;L0|#0ff4292df-e4cb-4133-95d5-e9035896836c|emergency services;GP0|#30ed7e10-4c9b-499f-a30c-3cdc3fc9e6c8;L0|#030ed7e10-4c9b-499f-a30c-3cdc3fc9e6c8|Safety and Security Directorate;GP0|#0d8e6bd3-01a1-42b8-8f93-d87f4e7dadae;L0|#00d8e6bd3-01a1-42b8-8f93-d87f4e7dadae|search and rescue;GP0|#50532c45-566c-4d78-ad56-b170edc4d419;L0|#050532c45-566c-4d78-ad56-b170edc4d419|fire and life officers;GP0|#4dcb0ae7-f7de-4e45-ba19-c0ee87eaa35d;L0|#04dcb0ae7-f7de-4e45-ba19-c0ee87eaa35d|command and control staff;GP0|#0645d8ae-4b73-4d4a-a7a9-341605e31e29;L0|#00645d8ae-4b73-4d4a-a7a9-341605e31e29|fire prevention;GP0|#e05a2606-05ba-4ef0-a872-bdef1bb73997;L0|#0e05a2606-05ba-4ef0-a872-bdef1bb73997|fire inspections;GP0|#05d652f7-6778-4511-a8fd-de1af7f52c56;L0|#005d652f7-6778-4511-a8fd-de1af7f52c56|hazardous materials;GP0|#f58faf55-8582-420e-ac46-eeb2f05bc6e6;L0|#0f58faf55-8582-420e-ac46-eeb2f05bc6e6|firefighter
Metro Police DepartmentGP0|#b480eb1b-cfa8-45cf-ab3d-21f848f482e9;L0|#0b480eb1b-cfa8-45cf-ab3d-21f848f482e9|safety and security;GTSet|#2e3de6c1-9951-4747-8f53-470629a399bb;GP0|#4c0f0261-7596-44f3-8161-86d4bd32156d;L0|#04c0f0261-7596-44f3-8161-86d4bd32156d|Police services;GP0|#5dfd7a7b-84c9-4a6d-ab55-ff5d5f7e710b;L0|#05dfd7a7b-84c9-4a6d-ab55-ff5d5f7e710b|by-law enforcement;GP0|#2511a79d-ced9-4ca5-b161-3e9929266ea7;L0|#02511a79d-ced9-4ca5-b161-3e9929266ea7|Crime prevention;GP0|#04bebfed-49b9-406a-a75a-f7414f8d9bf8;L0|#004bebfed-49b9-406a-a75a-f7414f8d9bf8|CCTV surveillance;GP0|#fa398fa6-831f-4358-9c72-e9afa39997c9;L0|#0fa398fa6-831f-4358-9c72-e9afa39997c9|SAPS;GP0|#8a4b9ef0-0abd-4811-a93e-43b5fd20f3cb;L0|#08a4b9ef0-0abd-4811-a93e-43b5fd20f3cb|Substance Abuse;GP0|#10bf7f95-3ff8-40a2-a2bd-db5e41df6446;L0|#010bf7f95-3ff8-40a2-a2bd-db5e41df6446|Gangsterism;GP0|#ed10cb15-0530-4915-bc5c-b99f04417fc0;L0|#0ed10cb15-0530-4915-bc5c-b99f04417fc0|traffic law enforcement services;GP0|#1a546bcb-c1b0-428e-8480-5272917b4891;L0|#01a546bcb-c1b0-428e-8480-5272917b4891|canine unit;GP0|#377804c6-9c66-48b2-b50c-b2582824f5a2;L0|#0377804c6-9c66-48b2-b50c-b2582824f5a2|Drugs;GP0|#91e55ebd-5010-4ecf-8f4c-4260f6c9f9f0;L0|#091e55ebd-5010-4ecf-8f4c-4260f6c9f9f0|security awareness;GP0|#2f6c5b49-7298-4fc0-8d4a-c1f030f0fc92;L0|#02f6c5b49-7298-4fc0-8d4a-c1f030f0fc92|alcohol abuse

 

 

City welcomes peace deal reached by two groups of Imizamo Yethu community leaders <p>​Yesterday, 22 July 2017, two groups of community leaders in Imizamo Yethu met to negotiate a peace deal to restore calm in the area so that the City of Cape Town’s super-blocking project could proceed.<br> <br>The two groups include a small group of community leaders who were against the super-blocking and the majority of the leaders who are in support of the project and who have been working with the City to ensure that the project can progress. <br> <br>The two groups of leaders met along with City political leaders, City officials, and senior members of the South African Police Service at the Hout Bay Fire Station. <br> <br>The two community leader groups came to an agreement in which the one group was updated about the super-blocking project and they agreed to engage the community at large to put an end to the violence so that the project can continue.<br> <br>A way forward was agreed to where three meetings will take place with the broader community today, 23 July 2017 on three sites: the Dontse Yakhe site, the Disa site and the sports field in Imizamo Yethu.<br> <br>The violence which flared up again this past week caused a delay in the super-blocking project, with contractors being pulled off site as their lives and equipment were in danger. The houses of three community leaders who are working with the City were also burnt down during the violent protests this past week.<br> <br>The group of leaders who were previously opposed to the super-blocking process have agreed to engage with the City and a series of engagements has been planned to ensure that they are updated regularly on the project’s progress as we have been doing with the community leaders who have always been on board and working with the City.<br> <br>The community leaders further agreed that the City’s work on the super-blocking must continue tomorrow, 24 July 2017.</p><p>The City welcomes the peace deal that was reached between the two groups of community leaders. We are hopeful that the peace will hold so that we can continue with the project. <br> <br>The City reiterates its commitment to working with all leaders and residents to ensure that we make progress possible together and provide the services the residents need through the super-blocking project.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong><br></p>2017-07-22T22:00:00Z1
Boundary of municipal entity to manage Cape Town Stadium to be extended<span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/stadium1.jpg" style="width:612px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The original boundary of the municipal entity was limited to the area immediately surrounding the Cape Town Stadium. The City of Cape Town intends extending the functions of the municipal entity to include the management of the Green Point Urban Park, which was originally envisaged when the municipal entity was first recommended in January 2014. The original 2014 recommendation included the Green Point Urban Park in its analysis and business plan.</p><p>The proposed extended boundary will include the Green Point Athletics Track, all the sports fields, the golf course, and the urban park.</p><p>All interested and affected parties are able to submit their comments and input on the proposal to extend the functions of the municipal entity from today, 21 July 2017 until 21 August 2017.</p><p> ‘We have identified the need for an integrated approach for the management of the wider precinct. Therefore we are proposing that the original larger precinct be managed by the municipal entity. As part of our Organisational Development and Transformation Plan, we need to optimise the use of our natural and strategic assets in an integrated manner,’ said the City’s Acting Mayoral Committee Member for Finance, Councillor Stuart Diamond.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Cape%20Town%20Stadium_interior1.jpg" style="width:511px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span><p>The Cape Town Stadium, Green Point Athletics Track, and the Green Point Urban Park have over the past eight years received increased attention as priority assets in terms of event hosting, destination profiling, integrated spatial and facility management, environmental and heritage management, and commercial and economic development for the City.</p><p>‘Currently these assets are managed as a separate unit from other community and recreational facilities located in the urban park. This has over the years created differing operating and management standards, a fragmented approach to hosting events, and multiple entry points into the City pertaining to matters on this precinct. The need to consolidate all operations into an integrated management structure for greater impact is thus required. Commercial opportunities within these assets and sites will require a coordinated and integrated approach from a centralised position,’ added Councillor Diamond. </p><p>The functions of the entity would include general facility and operations; events and entertainment services management; commercialisation, marketing and hospitality management; finance, legal and administration management; and management of the Green Point Urban Park precinct.</p><p>The additional management requirements will necessitate an increased staff complement. A further six staff members would be seconded to the municipal entity. As with the other staff members, due process will be followed in respect of the secondment. The staff complement would be increased from 38 to 44. </p><p>The municipal entity will have the right of use over the Stadium precinct in terms of a long-term lease. A service delivery agreement will be entered into in respect of the management and operation of the Stadium and Green Point Urban Park precincts.</p><p>This entity will be a State-owned company, fully owned by the City. </p><p><br><strong>End</strong></p>​​</span>2017-07-20T22:00:00Z1
More safety and security veterans join the 20+ club<span><figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Group%20photo%20%28Combined%20years%20of%20service%20of%205841%29%202.jpg" style="width:338px;height:196px;" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> <p>The City of Cape Town’s Safety and Security Directorate today paid tribute to more than 200 staff members who have all reached long service milestones. The 212 officers and staff who were given long-service awards today have between them given 5 481 years of service.</p><p>The staff members from the City’s enforcement and rescue services have been in the City’s employ for between 20 and 45 years – the bulk of them employed by the Fire and Rescue Service, Law Enforcement, Traffic and Coordination Services. A full list of recipients is available here.</p><p>‘These recipients represent on the job experience that money cannot buy and I am immensely proud to be associated with the Directorate. Maintaining safety and security is a tough ask on any given day and in a city of more than four million people, there’s hardly a moment to switch off. I wish to thank all of our long-service recipients, as well as the staff in general, for their hard work and commitment to making Cape Town a safer place for everyone in it,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Patrick%20Muir%20receives%20his%20award%20for%2045%20years%20of%20service%20%282%29.jpg" style="width:523px;" /><figcaption> <p>  © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span></span>Among the 99 staff members who are now joining the ‘20+ club’ is the first female Divisional Commander in the Fire and Rescue Service, Arlene Wehr.<p>Wehr joined the Fire and Rescue Service in 1996 – she was one of the first female firefighters employed by the City and faced many challenges in what was then a male-dominated environment. Wehr turned the challenges into opportunities and worked her way through the ranks to her current position: Divisional Commander. She has also been responsible for planning and leading City delegations to numerous World Firefighter Games competitions and has her sights set on even more achievements.</p><span>​​</span><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/Michael%20Gardener%20takes%20a%20selfie%20with%20his%20collegues.jpg" style="width:576px;" /><figcaption> <p>   © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span>‘It is easy to forget the sacrifices and contributions of our staff when we’re literally fighting fires and handling disasters and crime on a daily basis. An event like this allows one to pause and appreciate the individuals and remind ourselves of their personal and professional achievements, growth and development over the years. The City of Cape Town is fortunate to have the calibre of employees who live the values of the Organisational Development and Transformation Plan and understand the principle of customer-centric delivery by putting our residents first in everything they do,’ added Alderman Smith.<p><br><strong>End</strong><br></p><p> </p><span><span></span><p> </p>​​</span>2017-07-20T22:00:00Z1
City doubles funding to SPCA<p>​The City of Cape Town has extended its agreement with the Cape of Good Hope SPCA to provide support services to the Law Enforcement Department. The first three-year service level agreement was worth R4,5 million and this time the City is increasing the allocation to R9 million for the same period.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/spca2.jpg" /><figcaption> <p>   © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span>The SPCA provides veterinary and general animal welfare services to the City that are required in terms of the Animal By-law but do not reside within the Law Enforcement Department, which is mandated to enforce the by-law.<p>The agreement effectively means that the SPCA supports Law Enforcement with the impoundment of stray animals or animals involved in attacks and homes them for the prescribed impoundment periods.</p><p>The City’s Animal Control Unit deals with hundreds of complaints every month, including domestic animal nuisances, roaming cattle, and other livestock and dog attacks. In the first five months of this year, the Unit impounded 140 animals, responded to 90 animal attacks and served 124 compliance notices in terms of the Animal By-law.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits right"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/spca1.jpg" /><figcaption> <p>   © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure> </span>‘Partnering with an animal welfare organisation like the SPCA is of utmost importance to the City and there is immense value in outsourcing animal welfare matters to those with the requisite experience instead of trying to recreate that capacity within the City. This focus on partnerships is in line with our Organisational Development and Transformation Plan and most importantly it helps us protect more animals that are left destitute and build safer communities by addressing threats where they exist.<p>‘I think the fact that we doubled our funding is a clear intent of our commitment to the cause of animals, but society in general. With this new agreement, the City of Cape Town provides more funding for animal welfare than any other municipality in the country,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security; and Social Services, Alderman JP Smith.</p><p>During the last financial year the SPCA provided much-needed services to 9 279 stray animals, 132 seized animals and 208 impounded animals. The funding provided for these animals by the City of Cape Town contributed significantly towards their welfare by enabling the organisation to maintain the highest standards of animal husbandry and care, while providing a safe and comfortable haven for these animals.</p><span>​<figure class="figure-credits left"><img class="responsive" alt="placeholder" src="http://resource.capetown.gov.za/cityassets/Media%20Centre/spca3.jpg" /><figcaption> <p> © City of Cape Town</p> </figcaption> </figure></span>‘The benefits derived from the signing of this service level agreement will allow us to focus on our core business, the prevention of cruelty to animals, instead of being preoccupied with raising sorely needed operating funds to take care of the city’s many thousands of stray, impounded and seized animals admitted into our care following the curtailment of services offered by the Atlantis Pound.<p>‘The City has consistently demonstrated its sincere commitment to the welfare and well-being of animals by enabling not only the SPCA, but the Cape Animal Welfare Forum to deliver a world-class service that would otherwise be out of reach for many indigent animal owners – including subsistence livestock keepers and working horse owners – by co-funding projects and promulgating and enforcing legislation to help ensure the rights of animals. Long may this partnership endure,’ said Cape of Good Hope SPCA CEO, Allan Perrins.</p><p><br><strong>End</strong><br></p>2017-07-19T22:00:00Z1

 

 

 

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