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Wynberg Park

Wynberg Park

Wynberg Park, which ranges over 22 hectares of sloping ground, is where the spring of the Krakeelwater river begins (hence “Springfield” Convent and School below the park).

The park is visited throughout the year for its conifer garden, and in summer boasts an attractive display of hydrangeas. Higher up the slopes of the park, visitors are able to see vestiges of the silvertree (Leucodendron argenteum), which were once so prevalent in the area. Loss of habitat has decimated the numbers of this prominent and attractive tree.


Inside the park

  • Attractive paths
  • Children's playground
  • Duck pond
  • Lawns, ideal for picnics and braais
  • Concerts and fun days
  • The City's Come and Play teams offer extreme sports demonstrations, games, stage activities and fun activities for smaller children.
  • Conifer garden

History

wynberg Park

If you amble up to the section of the park which borders Trovato Link Road, you'll find a white marble fountain inscribed with the following words: “To commemorate the Coronation of Kind Edward VII, 9 August 1902.” The land for the Kind Edward Park, as it was then known, was obtained via the combined efforts of William Horne, a Wynberg resident and William Morom, a councillor of the Wynberg Municipality. Together these two men negotiated the grant for this extensive stretch of ground on Wynberg Hill in the 1890s.

Once granted, the park was magnificently landscaped with waterways, lawns, trees, shrubs and formal flower displays, although a large section was allowed to remain wild. A tea-room was provided, as was a bandstand in which the military band played to large audiences.

The park was formally opened in 1902 by the Honourable Thomas Graham, who spoke eloquently about the good fortune that had befallen Wynberg residents in having such natural assets, and commented prophetically that in years to come they would be glad they had conserved their open spaces. After the opening ceremony at the ornamental fountain, the Guild of Loyal Women (formed during the South Africa War), planted commemorative saplings that are now handsome trees shading an area close to the duck pond.

Despite losing some of its land to the freeway, the park has been well preserved and is a favoured place for recreation and relaxation.



For more information:

Contact Person: Ntsiki Mlotywa

Tel: 021 710 9403

Office hours: 08h00–16h30

© City of Cape Town, 2014